Seymour Duncan has announced a new neck pickup designed especially for 7- and 8-string guitars.

Santa Barbara, CA (June 3, 2013) -- When you're a seven-string player, you need a lot from your pickups. You need them to be able to handle the full sonic range, from the lowest of lows to the most screaming highs. You need them to be adaptable, because seven-stringers tend to explore a wide range of styles, sometimes within a single song. And more than anything, you need them to be articulate: to connect directly to your psyche and then to take your innermost feelings and send them screaming out of your amplifier for your audience to hear.

That's what the Sentient is for.

The Sentient is a neck pickup which pairs equally well with the Pegasus (for prog rock and modern metal) and the Nazgûl (for aggressive metal). It's voiced to capture a blend of vintage PAF and modern tones with enough output to deliver harmonically rich distorted lead tones, but subtle enough to give you deep, detailed cleans. Think of it as combining the best qualities of the '59 Model and the Jazz: clarity, detail, depth, attack and expression. The Sentient is available for both 7 and 8 string guitars and also comes in an active mount (soapbar sized) version for those who own a guitar that came with active pickups.

For more information:
Seymour Duncan

The emotional wallop of the acoustic guitar sometimes flies under the radar. Even if you mostly play electric, here are some things to consider about unplugging.

I have a love-hate relationship with acoustic guitars. My infatuation with the 6-string really blasted off with the Ventures. That’s the sound I wanted, and the way to get it was powered by electricity. Before I’d even held a guitar, I knew I wanted a Mosrite, which I was sure was made of fiberglass like the surfboards the Beach Boys, Surfaris, and the Challengers rode in their off time. Bristling with space-age switchgear and chrome-plated hardware, those solidbody hotrod guitars were the fighter jets of my musical dreams. I didn’t even know what those old-timey round-hole guitars were called. As the singing cowboys Roy Rogers and Gene Autrey strummed off into the sunset, the pace of technology pushed the look and sound of the electric guitar (and bass) into the limelight and into my heart. Imagine my disappointment when I had to begin my guitar tutelage on a rented Gibson “student” acoustic. At least it sort of looked like the ones the Beatles occasionally played. Even so, I couldn’t wait to trade it in.

Read More Show less

Megadeth founder teams up with Gibson for his first acoustic guitar in the Dave Mustaine Collection.

Read More Show less

A lightweight, portable amp series developed after months of forensic examination of vintage valve amps.

Read More Show less
x