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Tools for the Task: Pedalboard Power

Ten options for fueling your pedalboard population.

You may have taken on a new pedal or five after checking out all the reviews in the October 2016 issue, but when was the last time you assessed your power needs? We’ve rounded up 10 power supply units this month—big to small and loaded to simple—that are poised to serve as the heart of your pedalboard.  

Pigtronix Power

Able to power up to eight pedals, the fully isolated power outlets on this supply (four of which are switchable between 9V, 12V, 15V, and 18V) ensure stable power and ultra-low noise.

PIGTRONIX
$299

Powerbox Mk2

This unit houses five galvanically isolated output groups and can power up to 10 pedals. The output voltage of three of the five groups can be changed via the DIP switches located topside.

N-AUDIO ELECTRONICS
$207

Ojai

This pint-sized powerhouse is part of an expandable and modular system, and has five high-current, individually isolated, ultra-low-noise outputs to help pedals achieve their highest dynamic range.

STRYMON
$149

PB-107/Power Box Lithium

Via the included 8-plug daisy chain cable, this rechargeable power supply takes care of pedal-powering needs while displaying battery status, current draw, and time remaining.

BIG JOE STOMP BOX COMPANY
$149

1 Spot Pro CS12

This power brick features 12 isolated outputs, five voltage options to power just about any pedal, switchable input voltage, and includes brackets to mount under Pedaltrain pedalboards.

TRUETONE
$179

Provolt9

This unit employs star grounding—rather than parallel connections—to suppress unwanted hum, and provides a consistent, ideal 9.6V to each of its six outputs.

PROVIDENCE
$149

Kerosene

Housed in a rugged aluminum alloy chassis, this micro-sized power supply can help clean up power-cord and pedalboard clutter with its tiny footprint, while still offering eight 9V DC outputs.

OUTLAW EFFECTS
$65

Adam

Small and flat enough to tuck under the tiniest of pedalboards, this power supply offers a pair of fixed 9V outlets and a second pair that are both configurable to 9V or 12V.

CIOKS
$109

Phoenix

So you have a lot of pedals. Not a problem for this 15-output power supply that uses two internal custom-wound toroidal transformers to deliver ultra-clean power and superior noise filtering.

WALRUS AUDIO
$279

Pedal Power 2 Plus

All eight outputs on this handmade power supply are completely isolated to eliminate tone robbing, prevent hum, and allow combining of outputs to create different voltages.

VOODOO LAB
$169

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Amazon Prime Day is here (July 16-17). Whether you're a veteran player or just picking up your first guitar, these are some bargains you don't want to miss. Check out more deals here! https://amzn.to/3LskPRV

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A technicolor swirl of distortion, drive, boost, and ferocious fuzz.

Summons a wealth of engaging, and often unique, boost, drive, distortion, and fuzz tones that deviate from common templates. Interactive controls.

Finding just-right tones, while rewarding, might demand patience from less assured and experienced drive-pedal users. Tone control could be more nuanced.

$199

Danelectro Nichols 1966
danelectro.com

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The Danelectro Nichols 1966, in spite of its simplicity, feels and sounds like a stompbox people will use in about a million different ways. Its creator, Steve Ridinger, who built the first version as an industrious Angeleno teen in 1966, modestly calls the China-made Nichols 1966 a cross between a fuzz and a distortion. And, at many settings, it is most certainly that.

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Keep your head down and put in the work if you want to succeed in the gear-building business.

The accelerated commodification of musical instruments during the late 20th century conjures up visions of massive factories churning out violins, pianos, and, of course, fretted instruments. Even the venerable builders of the so-called “golden age” were not exactly the boutique luthier shops of our imagination.

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