Blue Microphones Announces the Hummingbird

A unique pivoting head enables free range of motion for fast and precise positioning.

Westlake Village, CA (April 24, 2015) -- Blue Microphones announces the availability of Hummingbird, a versatile and precision-engineered Class A small-diaphragm microphone. With a precisely tuned diaphragm based on Blue’s B1 capsule, Hummingbird is ultra-responsive and delivers extended frequency response, making it the perfect studio and stage solution for drum overheads, acoustic guitar, strings, harp, or any other instrument with fast transients and rich overtones. Hummingbird features an adjustable pivoting head that allows for 180 degrees of rotation so users can set the mic at any angle to unlock the tonal nuances of their instruments.

“With fast transient response, high SPL handling and extended high frequency, Hummingbird is an exceptional small diaphragm microphone. To take it further, we designed the capsule to rotate 180 degrees for easy placement and now you have an undeniable weapon for drum overheads, acoustic guitar, piano and more,” said Tommy Edwards, Director of Product Management at Blue. “Like its avian counterpart, the Hummingbird is compact, able to fit precisely into tight spaces, and can nimbly change positions where others can’t.”

Featuring a premium pressure gradient cardioid capsule based on Blue’s “B1” capsule—from the flagship “interchangeable” Bottle Caps —and a proprietary Class A, fully discrete circuit, Hummingbird offers balanced character with plenty of sparkling high end. With no ICs in the signal path, the mic exhibits maximum detail and the lowest possible noise floor. The sonically versatile Hummingbird can capture the nuances of a wide range of instruments—though its agility, extended high-frequency response, and ability to handle high sound pressure levels make it an ideal mic for recording drums. Hummingbird’s transparency and superb dynamic range deliver superior sound reproduction every time.

Inspired by the Dragonfly and Mouse microphones, Hummingbird’s unique 180-degree pivoting head enables free range of motion for fast and precise positioning, making it possible to achieve better sound, quickly and easily. When using two Hummingbirds as stereo overheads, the 180-degree rotating head allows an engineer to precisely dial in the stereo field in seconds—a task that can be long and tedious when using traditional mics on mic stands.

Hummingbird comes with a rugged, road ready protective carrying case, along with a mic clip and foam wind screen. Hummingbird (MSRP $299.99) is now available at authorized retailers.

For more information:
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