The TU-3W provides tuning functions equivalent to the immensely popular TU-3.


Los Angeles, CA (June 16, 2016) -- Boss is pleased to add four new models to its lineup of electronic tuners for musical instruments. Featuring Boss’ trusted tuning technology, innovative features, and famous rugged reliability, the new models expand the extensive Boss tuner range to provide even more top-quality solutions for guitarists, bassists, and all types of musicians and music educators.

The Waza Craft TU-3W Chromatic Tuner is a special-edition pedal tuner that offers refined performance for pro players and hard-core stompbox enthusiasts. At its core, the TU-3W provides tuning functions equivalent to the immensely popular TU-3. Following the Boss Waza Craft philosophy, the pedal’s benchmark functionality is enhanced even further. Pure, uncolored signal transfer is essential for a tuner, and the TU-3W features redesigned circuitry with selectable buffered or true-bypass operation and the most transparent audio pass-through possible.

The compact TU-3S Chromatic Tuner is also based on the TU-3, and offers the same industry-standard performance in a scaled-down size for guitar and bass pedalboards. The tuning functions are identical to the TU-3 – the only thing eliminated is the pedal switch. Always on and ready to go, the TU-3S works well with pedal switching systems like the Boss ES-8 and ES-5, and is a great addition to any setup where space is at a premium.

Ideal for guitar, bass and ukulele, the new TU-01 Clip-On Chromatic Tuner is the most affordable tuner in the respected Boss lineup. Small, durable, and simple to use, it clips on an instrument’s headstock to provide convenient and reliable tuning. The TU-01’s bright display features a digital meter and note indicator, plus two lights that show when the instrument is perfectly in tune. The tuner also adjusts for different viewing angles, and folds down for easy transport in a case or gig bag.

The new TU-30 Tuner & Metronome delivers the main features of the respected TU-80 in an ultra-compact package. All the basics are carried over, including the convenient Accu-Pitch function, multiple tuning modes and rhythm patterns, the ability to sound reference pitches, and more. Combining trusted Boss tuning with a versatile metronome, the TU-30 is a useful mobile accessory for practicing musicians, music educators and traveling players.

For more information:
Boss

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