The series is now equipped with the Fishman INK3 USB system.

Bend, OR (November 19, 2014) -- Designed for recorded acoustic guitar performances, the Studio series captures all the sparkling detail and nuance of your performance. The figured maple back and sides offer a clear, precise tone that rises above the mix.

The Studio series is available in a concert, dreadnought and 12-string option. All have a new updated burst and the concert and 12-string are equipped with the Breedlove Bridge Truss. The BBT is mounted to the bridge from the inside and is connected into the tail block of the guitar, pulling downward on the underside of the bridge to distribute some of the tension, relieving pressure on the top. The resulting tonal effect on BBT-equipped guitars is more resonance and livelier sound with enhanced overtones.

The most exciting update for 2015 is the new pickup system. The Studio series is now equipped with the Fishman INK3 USB system. This onboard preamp features a Sonicore pickup, 3-band EQ, chromatic tuner and a low battery LED. It also has a USB that allows for quick access and recording straight from your guitar to your favorite recording software.

Additional appointments include an elegant abalone rosette, ivoroid binding and sparkling mother of pearl offset dots inlayed along the fretboard. All models include come with a deluxe foamshell gigbag and come with D’Addario strings.

With a price point of $1,199 MSRP and $899 MAP, this series is available in a concert, dreadnought, 12-string option.

Watch the company's video demo:

For more information:
Breedlove

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