Composite Acoustics Unveils Upgraded Models

These one-piece neck/body construction guitars made of carbon fiber are known for their durability, sleek design, and consistent tone.

Meridian, MS (July 18, 2017) -- Composite Acoustics proudly introduces their revamped acoustic guitars at the 2017 Summer NAMM Show in Nashville. These one-piece neck/body construction guitars made of carbon fiber are known for their durability, sleek design, and consistent tone. Now featuring an easy-to-clean black satin finish on the back for more durability, these guitars are the ideal choice for touring musicians in all climates.

"A significant benefit of carbon fiber guitars is their ability to withstand extreme variations in climate conditions. This means that even in intensely hot or humid conditions, the instruments will stay in tune longer than traditional wooden guitars while also retaining their precise setup," said Courtland Gray, Chief Operating Officer of Peavey Electronics Corp.

Easily fitting into airline overheads, the Composite Acoustics Cargo guitar is the perfect partner for summer travel. Already offered in a range of colors, these guitars will now be available with a stunning transparent red or transparent blue finish. Players will immediately note the Cargo’s offset sound hole with integrated top bracing technology (IBT). The proprietary carbon fiber bridge and saddle materials provide maximum sound transfer, while the optional L.R. Baggs Active Element pickup system is a premium option for easy and clear amplification. With black chrome hardware, this guitar is bound to make a statement.

The popular GX and classic Legacy models also received additional upgrades. Each guitar will now be equipped with custom made 19:1 ratio Hipshot tuning machines. Both models also feature a center sound hole with abalone sound hole ring, a proprietary reinforced polymer fretboard with 20 medium stainless steel frets, and a hardshell case.

Composite Acoustics continues to set new standards in playability in the world of carbon fiber instruments. Learn more about the guitars at compositeacoustics.com or by visiting booth #623 at the Summer NAMM show through July 15.

For more information:
Composite Acoustics

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