Ten fully isolated outputs deliver dependable, noise-free power for effects pedals.

Salt Lake City, UT (October 24, 2012) – HARMAN’s DigiTech today announced the introduction of its HardWire V-10 Power Block 10-Pedal Isolated Power Supply, a top-quality pedalboard power supply with ten fully isolated outputs that deliver dependable, noise-free power for effects pedals.

“A guitarist’s pedalboard is only as good as its power supply,” said Scott Klimt, marketing manager for DigiTech. “We designed the V-10 Power Block to be the best power supply on the market and give musicians the best sound and performance from all of their effects pedals, night after night.”

The HardWire V-10 Power Block features 10 totally isolated high-current outputs and a shielded low-stray-field toroidal transformer to eliminate hum and noise that can be caused by ground loops and interference. Four 9-volt outputs are provided, along with two pairs of 9V/12V merge-able outputs for power-hungry digital pedals, and two outputs with variable voltage from 5 to 12 volts.

The HardWire V-10 Power Block is built road-tough with a heavy-grade aircraft aluminum chassis that allows for maximum heat dissipation. Measuring 7.5" x 3.5" x 2.2", the V-10 mounts perfectly under Pedaltrain™ pedalboards. It utilizes standard 2.1 x 5.5mm barrel jack connectors and delivers 1200mA total DC current. The V-10’s front-panel LEDs provide ready indication of output jack status. The V-10 comes with 17 DC power cables from 18" to 30", including 2.1mm and 2.5mm barrel plugs with positive (+) and negative (-) centers, 3.5mm phone plugs and 9V battery clip.

The DigiTech HardWire V-10 Power Block carries a six-year warranty and will be available in October 2012 with a suggested retail price of $299.95.

For more information:
Harman

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