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Quick Hit: Korg Pitchblack Custom Review

Quick Hit: Korg Pitchblack Custom Review

A sleek, space-age-looking tuner that performs as good as it looks.

When on the hunt for a new tuner, accuracy and speed likely top the list of must-haves for most players, by far. As long as it’s spot-on and quick at getting the job done, you’re all set, right? What if you could have all that in a little box that looks like Darth Vader’s mobile command center?

Korg’s true-bypass Pitchblack Custom follows in the footsteps of its Pitchblack predecessor, but brings some notable improvements: a detection range of +/- 0.1 cents, triple the battery life, a sleeker look, and a smaller enclosure yet bigger display. The Pitchblack Custom’s 3-D vertical strobe-esque display is fantastic, and it instills confidence that this black box can handle its duties on the darkest of stages.

During the time I had with the Pitchblack Custom, I used it as my go-to tuner for a couple basses and a couple guitars while testing it alongside a trusty Boss TU-2. Accurate and fast? Check. However I tuned up, the display was crisp and clear, and I liked having four different meter-display modes available. I also liked that the display and calibration buttons are rear-side located and somewhat recessed—out of harm’s way from happy feet.

I’m a sucker for clean lines and precision engineering when it comes to motorcycles and tech, and that suckerness applies to music gear, too. The Pitchblack Custom didn’t leave me wanting for much else.

Test gear: Fender Precision, Epiphone Scroll, Gibson SG, Dell’Arte Dark Eyes

Ratings

Pros:
Reliable, quick, precise. It looks really cool!

Cons:
Adjustable brightness would be nice.

Street:
$99

Korg Pitchblack Custom
korg.com

Ease of Use:

Build/Design:

Value:

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