The guitar features period-correct ’70s Baldwin-era styling, pure White gloss nitrocellulose lacquer finish, V-shaped Falcon headstock, Silver Sparkle binding, custom wound hot "Black Top" Filter’Tron pickups with three-point adjustable ’70s-style metal bezels and Duffy’s preferred Bigsby tailpiece.

Scottsdale, AZ (January 5, 2013) – It is with great pleasure that Gretsch is releasing the G7593T Billy Duffy White Falcon guitar, which has immediately become one of the most unique and bewitching White Falcon guitars ever made. Featuring much of what Falcon fans hold dear, The Cult guitarist’s inimitable instrument has several unique aesthetic differences that separate it from the rest of the "Falcon" flock, namely its period-correct ’70s Baldwin-era styling, pure White gloss nitrocellulose lacquer finish, V-shaped Falcon headstock, Silver Sparkle binding, custom wound hot "Black Top" Filter’Tron pickups with three-point adjustable ’70s-style metal bezels and Duffy’s preferred Bigsby tailpiece.

In addition, Duffy’s signature bird of prey features a 17" wide, 2 ¾" deep single cut-away three-ply maple body with a three-ply maple arched top and back and two spruce parallel tone bars and sound post, a three-piece maple neck with ebony fingerboard, a chrome-plated truss rod cover with Duffy’s signature emblazoned on it, a chrome-plated output jack plate, pearloid wide-block fretboard inlays, ’70s-style aluminum "G" arrow knobs and a premium gray speckled "Billy Duffy" case. MSRP $5050.

"This guitar is very personal to me," said Duffy. "It’s hard to separate the guitar from the evolution of (The Cult’s) sound. In essence, the big white Gretsch became synonymous with the band very quickly. I’m not really that much of a sentimental person, but in a house fire it would be the first non-living thing that I’d be going for.

"It’s not for the faint-hearted," he added. "It’s massive. You’ve got to have big hands and you’ve got to really command the instrument when you play it. You can’t really play it with any degree of fear."

Watch Billy Duffy discuss the guitar in Gretsch's official video:

For more information:
Gretsch

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Advanced

Beginner

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Knowing how to function in different keys is crucial to improvising in any context. One path to fretboard mastery is learning how to move through positions across the neck. Even something as simple as a three-note-per-string major scale can offer loads of options when it’s time to step up and rip. I’m going to outline seven technical sequences, each one focusing on a position of a diatonic major scale. This should provide a fun workout for the fingers and hopefully inspire a few licks of your own.
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