LaBella Strings Revamps Nylon Tape Wound Series

Developed alongside Ron Carter and Attila Zoller, the revamped double bass tape wound strings combine elements from steel and chrome sets.

Newburgh, NY (October 17, 2013) -- As the innovators of today’s best-selling double bass sets for Jazz, La Bella Strings is proud to introduce its newly revamped Double Bass Nylon Tape Wound Series and announce the release of the 7710T White Nylon Tape Wound Set.

Developed alongside Ron Carter and Attila Zoller, the double bass tape wound strings capture the rich tone of gut and sustain of steel, all without the headaches of gut and overly metallic sound of chrome. The result is a one-of-a-kind formulation and construction, ideal for Jazz pizzicato and particularly solos. The Double Bass Nylon Tape Wound Series’ new packaging evokes the classic Jazz album covers of the 1950s and 1960s.

The original 7710 Black Nylon Tape Wound Double Bass set will now be referred to as the 7710N Black Nylon Tape Wound Set sold under the newly revamped packaging. The construction will remain the same, as it has been for over thirty years.

La Bella Strings is proud to introduce the new 7710T White Nylon Tape Wound, which takes the nylon tape construction to a whole new level. Unlike the 7710N Black Nylon Tape Wound Set, the 7710T strings are wound with a clear proprietary nylon to create an even smoother-to-the-touch string with brighter tone and clarity than the original 7710N strings.

As with all La Bella double bass sets, the standard double bass set is 3/4 size. Both the 7710T and 7710N are available in 1/4, 1/2, and 4/4 sizes, and also for Ampeg BB1 Baby Bass (Ampeg is a registered trademark of St. Louis Music). Optional High “C”, Low “C” and Low “C” in Extended Scale are also available.

For more information:
LaBella

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We’re almost finished with the aging process on our project guitar. Let’s work on the fretboard, nut, and truss rod cover, and prepare the headstock for the last hurrah.

Hello and welcome back to Mod Garage. This month we’ll continue with our relic’ing project, taking a closer look at the front side of the neck and treating the fretboard and the headstock. We’ll work on the front side of the headstock in the next part, but first we must prepare it.

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Diatonic sequences are powerful tools. Here’s how to use them wisely.

Advanced

Beginner

• Understand how to map out the neck in seven positions.
• Learn to combine legato and picking to create long phrases.
• Develop a smooth attack—even at high speeds.

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Knowing how to function in different keys is crucial to improvising in any context. One path to fretboard mastery is learning how to move through positions across the neck. Even something as simple as a three-note-per-string major scale can offer loads of options when it’s time to step up and rip. I’m going to outline seven technical sequences, each one focusing on a position of a diatonic major scale. This should provide a fun workout for the fingers and hopefully inspire a few licks of your own.
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