Lehle Rolls Out the Mono Volume 90 and Stereo Volume Pedals

The pair of wear-free volume pedals feature magnetic sensors, offer no sound loss, and there is no dampening of the higher frequencies.

Voerde, Germany (March 3, 2017) -- After the release of the rewarded and renowned Mono Volume last year, Lehle proudly announces its siblings:

Lehle Stereo Volume
We received a lot of requests for a stereo version. Now, not only keyboarders but all others who handle stereo signals can look forward to the new Lehle Stereo Volume.

  • Controls the volume on two channels from -92 dB (mute) to 0 dB (unity gain)
  • Operates wear-free via precision magnetic sensor
  • Without a mechanical potentiometer
  • No damping of higher frequencies
  • No sound loss over the entire control range
  • Supply voltage is rectified, then filtered, stabilized and doubled to 18V
  • Both outputs can be tapped balanced or unbalanced
  • Total dynamic range of 110 dB by use of a Blackmer® Stereo-VCA
  • Low-friction bearings
  • Finely adjustable brake
  • Summing function: two separate input signals can be summed to one output channel
  • Split function: a mono signal can be put out as dual mono

MSRP $ 399 / MAP $ 299

Lehle Mono Volume 90
Pedal steel players who use tables & racks and those who prefer the sockets on the side of the pedal can discover the new LEHLE MONO VOLUME 90.

  • Controls the volume from -92 dB (mute) to 0 dB (unity gain)
  • Minimum Volume Control (0-90%) and Gain Control (+12 dB Boost) • Operates wear-free via precision magnetic sensor
  • Without a mechanical potentiometer
  • No damping of higher frequencies
  • No sound loss over the entire control range
  • Supply voltage is rectified, then filtered, stabilized and doubled to 18V. • Total dynamic range of 110 dB by use of a Blackmer® VCA
  • Low-friction bearings
  • Finely adjustable brake
  • Buffered direct-out, as an output for a tuner or second amp
  • In- and output jacks on the side, ideal for pedal steel players

MSRP $ 399 / MAP $ 299

For more information:
LEHLE

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Advanced

Beginner

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