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Martin Announces the 00-42S John Mayer Custom Signature Edition

Mayer and Martin join forces again to create a follow up to last year’s custom model that is more affordable and accessible to meet high customer demand

Nazareth, PA (January 20, 2013) - John Mayer and C.F. Martin & Co. were happy to join forces once again to create a new version of the “cowboy guitar” – the 00-42SC John Mayer Custom Signature Edition. Conceived as a direct follow-up to the successful 00-45SC John Mayer Stagecoach Edition that was produced in extremely limited quantity in 2012, this new model was created to be a more affordable option to collectors and Mayer fans alike.

“We are proud to continue the Martin tradition of partnering with John Mayer,” said Chris Martin, Chairman and CEO, C.F. Martin & Co. “For over a decade, John has been a devoted fan of our custom models. Our last collaboration was a rousing success both in sales and fan reception. We are confident that we will repeat that pattern with the 00-42SC.”

“I am absolutely stunned by my Stagecoach guitar every time I play it,” said John Mayer. “It has the charisma that very few guitars have. I connect with it sonically and feel wise... but that third thing is very rare. It honest to God stimulates my imagination on some other level. I know it sounds like hyperbole, but it's quite an accomplishment.”

The 00-42SC John Mayer Custom Signature Edition maintains many elements reminiscent of the original 00-45SC, including the unique eye-catching style 45 rosette inlay that continues into the fingerboard extension. Golden Era-style 42 snowflakes and CFM block inlay are all executed in exquisite blue paua pearl. Beautiful and dense cocobolo is retained for the back and sides, creating complex bass, generous mid-range, clear trebles, and uncommon power and sustain.

John Mayer has been busy since he introduced the Martin 00-45SC John Mayer Stagecoach Edition last year. The seven-time Grammy Award-winner put the finishing touches on Born and Raised, his fifth album. Released in May, Born and Raised became Mayer’s third album to reach No. 1 on the Billboard “Top 200” list, a position it held for two weeks. The album also garnered rave reviews and produced two singles: “Shadow Days” and “Queen of California.” Plans for a North American concert tour were derailed by a recurrence of vocal problems that silenced Mayer early in the decade, but while receiving treatment and resting his voice, he played guitar for vocalist Frank Ocean on “Saturday Night Live,” at the “Love for Levon” concert honoring the late Levon Helm and on tracks for legendary pianist Chuck Leavell’s next album.

Each 00-42SC John Mayer Custom Signature Edition is delivered in a Geib-style hard shell case. A left-handed version of this guitar may be ordered at no additional charge and factory-installed electronics are an extra-cost option. Authorized C.F. Martin dealers are now accepting orders for the open-ended 00-42SC John Mayer Custom Signature Edition and participating dealers will be listed on the Martin website.

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