A single-channel, 50-watt bass combo with a 7” driver and 3” tweeter.

St Louis, MO (February 15, 2019) -- PJB bass tone-to-go just got more portable and affordable with the Phil Jones Bass Micro 7 combo. The Micro 7 is a single channel 50-watt bass combo with a 7” driver and 3” tweeter. It measures less than a foot on all sides and weighs only 15.5 lbs. The street price is $279. making it the most affordable and compact combo from PJB yet.

The Micro 7 uses the same high level of quality parts that musicians have come to expect on all PJB products. The goal was to achieve the highest level in tone quality at an unbeatable price with the result being the ultimate sounding practice amp for the home.

The Micro 7 dimensions are (WxDxH): 11.2" x9.7" x9.8" and will work on any AC voltage from 100 to 260 Volts without the need of a selector. Other features include Class D amplification, highly efficient and proprietary PJB 7-inch speaker and a 3” high frequency transducer, solid kick proof acoustically transparent curved steel grill, stereo headphone input, bass/mid/treble controls, auxiliary input and level control, and preamp line out. The frequency response is 36Hz -22KHz with a Signal to Noise Ratio Better than 84dB (EQ center, Volume on Full.)

Established in 2002, PJB and AIRPULSE Guitar Amps are divisions of Phil Jones American Acoustic Development. PJB is dedicated to using the latest technology in the design of compact bass amps and loudspeakers that achieve highest in fidelity and volume. Phil Jones owns several patents for loudspeaker technology.

Watch the company's video demo:

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