One of the company's most popular pedals gets the micro-sized treatment.

Nashville, TN (June 25, 2016) -- Famous for its noiseless clean sustain, Pigtronix Philosopher's Tone stands out as a uniquely powerful guitar effect in the crowded world of compressor pedals. Ushering in a new generation of futuristic analog technology, the Philosopher's Tone Micro delivers all of the parallel optical compression and unrivaled sustain of the original award-winning Pigtronix pedal in a micro-size chassis that runs on standard 9V external power.

In addition to volume and sustain controls, the Philosopher's Tone Micro features a parallel blend knob that allows the musician to mix their instrument's original tone with the compressed sound effect. This technique restores natural pick-attack and allows more extreme sustain settings to remain musical. The treble control provides up to 6 dB cut or boost at 2KHz for fine-tuning the frequency response of the effect. The Philosopher's Tone Micro features true-bypass switching and 9V operation, with internal 18V power rails for maximum clean headroom, even when used with hot pickups and line-level signals.

Practitioners of the mystical and ancient art of alchemy long sought an element called the Philosopher's Stone, believing that, if found, it could turn lead into gold and bestow immortality upon the person who wielded it. The Philosopher's Tone Micro represents an analog musical equivalent to this mythical substance in the world of guitar.

Features:

  • Noiseless clean sustain
  • Blend control for parallel compression
  • Treble EQ for boost or cut at 2kHz
  • Runs on standard 9V external power
  • Internal 18V power for maximum headroom
  • True bypass switching
  • Size = 3.75" x 1.5" x 1.75"

Available as of August 1, 2016; selling for $119 USD.

Watch the company's video demo:

For more information:
Pigtronix

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