10 Acoustic DIs for the Modern Musician

From simple to complex, analog to digital, these feedback-busting boxes can make your next unplugged gig a bit easier.

Acoustic amplification can be a tricky dragon to tame. This collection of DIs ranges from entry level and affordable to road-tough, pro-level designs with an eye-boggling amount of features.


ZOOM AC-3 Acoustic Creator

ZOOM AC-3 Acoustic Creator

This acoustic-focused DI adds a bit of digital-modeling mojo to help shape the sound of your guitar to one of 15 target models. Also in the mix are a handful of useful modulation effects, compression, and a boost.
$299 street
zoomcorp.com

Audio Sprockets Tone Dexter

Audio Sprockets Tone Dexter

Rather than just plugging in and dialing some knobs, you train this inventive DI by miking up your guitar and allowing the unit to learn about any missing aural info. Once the wave map is saved, you can pull it up on the gig.
$399 street
audiosprockets.com

Mesa/Boogie Rosette

Mesa/Boogie Rosette

The focus is on massaging those pesky frequencies with a sweepable midrange control, a 4-band EQ, and a powerful filter section. Dual outputs and an effects loop round out this acoustic picker's playground.
$379 street
mesaboogie.com

Tech 21 Acoustic Fly Rig

Building upon the company's line of slim multi-effects units, this version comes with a special notch-filter equipped SansAmp, reverb, compressor, XLR output, and much more.
$299 street
tech21nyc.com

Radial AC-Driver

Radial AC-Driver

This compact preamp only delivers the most essential features for acoustic instruments, with streamlined EQ controls, a tuner out, and a customizable notch filter—making this high-quality circuit a pedalboard space saver.
$149 street
radialeng.com

L.R. Baggs VoicePrint DI

LR BAGGS Voiceprint DI

This tech-heavy stomp uses the power of your phone to leverage a custom impulse response to improve your tone. With a few strums and taps, the Voiceprint learns all it needs to know about your guitar and what frequencies it needs.
$399 street
lrbaggs.com

Fishman ToneDEQ

This pro-level DI also adds a handful of modulation effects into the mix, including reverb, delay, tremolo, and flanger, for your more cosmic acoustic adventures.
$319 street
fishman.com

Boss AD-10

Boss AD-10

If you only can pack one pedal for the gig, the AD-10 offers a wealth of features for the solo singer/songwriter, including an 80-second looper to cop those Ed Sheeran vibes. Dual inputs, stereo outputs, and an effects loop make Boss' flagship acoustic stomp hard to beat.
$359 street
boss.info

BBE Acoustimax

A medium-sized mothership that offers all the essential EQ controls that acoustic pickers value. Bonus features include tuner out, effects loop and line out, plus an XLR output.
$169 street
bbesound.com

Grace Design Felix2

This sleek all-in-one preamp is a dream machine for those who need minute control of every wave of their tone. The latest iteration sports variable phase control, more EQ, and a built-in headphone amp for easy practicing.
$1,075 street
gracedesign.com

Multiple modulation modes and malleable voices cement a venerable pedal’s classic status.

Huge range of mellow to immersive modulation sounds. Easy to use. Stereo output. Useful input gain control.

Can sound thin compared to many analog chorus and flange classics.

$149

TC Electronic SCF Gold
tcelectronic.com

4.5
4
4.5
5

When you consider stompboxes that have achieved ubiquity and longevity, images of Tube Screamers, Big Muffs, or Boss’ DD series delays probably flash before your eyes. It’s less likely that TC Electronic’s Stereo Chorus Flanger comes to mind. But when you consider that its fundamental architecture has remained essentially unchanged since 1976 and that it has consistently satisfied persnickety tone hounds like Eric Johnson, it’s hard to not be dazzled by its staying power—or wonder what makes it such an indispensable staple for so many players.

Read More Show less

While Monolord has no shortage of the dark and heavy, guitarist and vocalist Thomas V Jäger comes at it from a perspective more common to pop songsmiths.

Photo by Chad Kelco

Melodies, hooks, clean tones, and no guitar solos. Are we sure this Elliott Smith fan fronts a doom-metal band? (We’re sure!)

Legend has it the name Monolord refers to a friend of the band with the same moniker who lost hearing in his left ear, and later said it didn’t matter if the band recorded anything in stereo, because he could not hear it anyway. It’s a funny, though slightly tragic, bit of backstory, but that handle is befitting in yet another, perhaps even more profound, way. Doom and stoner metal are arguably the torch-bearing subgenres for hard rock guitar players, and if any band seems to hold the keys to the castle at this moment, it’s Monolord.

Read More Show less
x