The MT 15 is a two-channel amp designed around a pair of 6L6 tubes.

Stevensville, MD (January 24, 2018) -- Set to debut at the 2018 Winter NAMM Show, PRS Guitars and Mark Tremonti have announced two new Signature Models: The MT 15 amplifier & SE Mark Tremonti Standard. The models are the result of a close collaboration between PRS Guitars and the guitarist from the popular hard rock band, Alter Bridge. The Mark Tremonti “lunchbox” MT 15 amplifier and versatile SE Mark Tremonti Standard guitar model were designed with players in mind and offer exceptional sounds and value.

Lunchbox Hero – The Mark Tremonti MT 15 Amplifier

“We knew we wanted a low-wattage amp. The challenge was getting a lot of tone and features in a little box. We’re all blown away with how it turned out. It’s going to be great for someone to take it out of the box, set everything to noon, and have it sound great.” – Mark Tremonti

The MT 15 is a commanding two channel amp with balanced aggression and articulation. Powered by 6L6 tubes, the MT 15 has a large, bold sound, so you can dig in heavy with rhythms but also get singing lead tones out of one amp. Whether recording, practicing, writing, or playing a small room, this amp has everything you need.

The MT 15’s design started with heavier players in mind, but in the end, it has a lot to offer players of all genres. Like the PRS Archon amplifier, the MT 15 features five gain stages before the Master for full, lush distortion. The gain channel gets big, chunky tone with massive, tight low end, but it never loses its articulate note definition or great lead tone. The clean channel is bright and chimey, good with chords and fingerstyle playing – whether with a pic or not. The clean channel also features a push/pull boost control that adds a little overdrive for old school crunch. No matter what tone you dial in, the MT 15 stays balanced across the spectrum with a sweet, smooth tone that won’t bite your head off.

Additional features include an effects loop and bias adjusters that are accessible from the back panel for ease of servicing. Despite its 15 watts, the MT 15 sounds more like 50, so a half power switch that takes the MT to 7 watts is a welcome addition. Bottom line, the amount of features, the hugeness of the sound, and the raw horsepower of the circuit make the MT 15 an impressive lunchbox hero.

Rumors and speculation have been flying around this amp for the better part of year; fans can now dig into all the specs and demos and finally place their orders. Shipping is expected to begin in March of this year. The MT 15 is Mark Tremonti’s first signature amplifier.

Ready to Rock – The SE Mark Tremonti Standard

“I’m excited to re-introduce my signature SE Standard model, giving players all the features I demand with the most afford­able guitar yet.” – Mark Tremonti

The PRS Mark Tremonti Standard has a powerful voice that is well suited to heavy rock rhythm playing and melodic, soaring leads. The Tremonti “S” pickups and dual volume and tone controls allow players to dial in a wide variety of tones, never losing this model’s signature articulate aggression.

Additional appointments include, an all-mahogany body, rosewood fretboard with PRS bird inlays, as well as a Wide Thin maple neck and trem-up route, making the SE Mark Tremonti Standard fast, fun, and hard to put down.

“With so many aspiring players struggling to stick with guitar past the first year, we knew we wanted to deliver an affordable, quality guitar that players didn’t have to fight. We want the guitar to inspire you to play; it can’t be something you have to worry about staying in tune or simply working right. So while the [SE] Standards are our most affordable guitars to date, that doesn’t mean we compromised on tone, versatility, playability, or reliability,” said Jack Higginbotham, COO, PRS Guitars. “We’re proud to offer these guitars to the world.”

For more information:
PRS Guitars

Almost six decades after forming the short-lived Rising Sons, the two legends reconvene to pay tribute to the classic blues duo of Sonny Terry and Brownie McGhee on the warm and rootsy Get on Board.

Deep into Taj Mahal and Ry Cooder’s Get on Board: The Songs of Sonny Terry & Brownie McGhee, percussionist Joachim Cooder lays out, letting the two elder musicians can take a pass through “Pawn Shop Blues.” To start, they loosely play around with the song’s intro on their acoustic guitars. “Yeah, nice,” remarks Mahal off-handedly in his distinctive rasp—present since he was a young man but, at 79, he’s aged into it—and Cooder lightly chuckles. They hit the turnaround and settle into a slow, loping tempo. It’s a casual and informal affair—some notes buzz, and it sounds like one of them is stomping his foot intermittently. Except for Cooder’s slide choruses, neither guitar plays a rhythm or lead role. They simply converse.

Read More Show less

The emotional wallop of the acoustic guitar sometimes flies under the radar. Even if you mostly play electric, here are some things to consider about unplugging.

I have a love-hate relationship with acoustic guitars. My infatuation with the 6-string really blasted off with the Ventures. That’s the sound I wanted, and the way to get it was powered by electricity. Before I’d even held a guitar, I knew I wanted a Mosrite, which I was sure was made of fiberglass like the surfboards the Beach Boys, Surfaris, and the Challengers rode in their off time. Bristling with space-age switchgear and chrome-plated hardware, those solidbody hotrod guitars were the fighter jets of my musical dreams. I didn’t even know what those old-timey round-hole guitars were called. As the singing cowboys Roy Rogers and Gene Autrey strummed off into the sunset, the pace of technology pushed the look and sound of the electric guitar (and bass) into the limelight and into my heart. Imagine my disappointment when I had to begin my guitar tutelage on a rented Gibson “student” acoustic. At least it sort of looked like the ones the Beatles occasionally played. Even so, I couldn’t wait to trade it in.

Read More Show less

Need an affordable distortion pedal? Look no further.

We live in the golden age of boutique pedals that are loaded with advanced features—many of which were nearly unthinkable a decade or so ago. But there’s something that will always be valuable about a rock-solid dirt box that won’t break your wallet. Here’s a collection of old classics and newly designed stomps that cost less than an average concert ticket.

Read More Show less
x