A 26.75"-scale instrument that can be comfortably tuned to low A, B, or C.

Port Jefferson Station, NY (January 19, 2018) -- Supro USA will unveil a series of baritone guitars at next week’s NAMM show in Anaheim, California. The Supro Island Series Baritone applies the award-winning, retro-modern aesthetics of the Supro Hampton and Westbury guitar models to a 26.75” scale instrument that can be comfortably tuned to low A, B or C. The Supro Baritone features a satin-finished maple neck with a rosewood fretboard, and a choice of either ash or mahogany tone wood for the body. The instrument’s set-neck design utilizes an easy-access heel joint, a 12” fretboard radius, and jumbo fret wire to provide world-class playability—all the way up the neck.

The Natural Ash version of the Hampton Baritone features a gloss finish on the body with a satin neck for ultra-smooth, fast-playing feel. The Djent Black version of the Hampton Baritone has a mahogany body with a satin finish covering the entire instrument.

The Hampton Baritone features a trio of Mini Gold Foil pickups on a 5-way switch. This Strat-style pickup configuration provides hi-fi, low-noise, single-coil pickup tones from the neck, middle and bridge, as well as scooped and funky “in-between” sounds in the 2 & 4 positions. The middle pickup is reverse-wound for hum-free operation when combined with either of the outer pickups.

The Trans Blue Ash version of the Westbury Baritone features a gloss finish on the body, while the Natural Mahogany variant of the Westbury Baritone features a fully satin finish. The Westbury Baritone features humbucker-size Supro Gold Foil pickups and Les Paul-style 3-way switching, delivering massive lows with a strong midrange and sparkling top end. Found in numerous original Supro guitar and bass models from 1960s, the “Clear-Tone” pickups reproduce the wide frequency spectrum of the Westbury Baritone perfectly.

"The Hampton really nails the concept of a compact baritone. It growls and snaps like full-size, plus it's so comfortable to play!" – Mark Lettieri (Snarky Puppy)

Features:

  • Authentic Supro Gold Foil pickups
  • 12” radius rosewood fretboard
  • 26.75” scale maple neck
  • Ash or mahogany body
  • Tune-o- matic bridge
  • Supro wave tailpiece
  • Fits standard Supro gig bag
  • D'Addario 13-62 XL baritone strings

The Westbury Mahogany retails for $799, the Westbury Trans Blue is $899, the Hampton Djent Black is $829, and the Hampton Natural Ash is $899. In stock now and ready to ship!

Watch the company's video demo:

For more information:
Supro

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