Premier Guitar features affiliate links to help support our content. We may earn a commission on any affiliated purchases.

1937 Gibson L-Century

During the years 1933 and 1934, Chicago held a World’s Fair commemorating the “Century of Progress” since the time of its incorporation. The fair was meant to stimulate the local

During the years 1933 and 1934, Chicago held a World’s Fair commemorating the “Century of Progress” since the time of its incorporation. The fair was meant to stimulate the local economy during the crisis of the Great Depression. It was very successful and well attended.

The World’s Fair received a great deal of interest from around the world; especially in nearby areas like Kalamazoo, Michigan, home of the Gibson Company. Gibson decided to use the “Century of Progress” idea to name a new high-end flat-top guitar. The L-Century was the result, and it was produced from 1933 through 1941.

Gibson had introduced its L-series of flat tops in 1926, and by 1933 offered several different models at various prices. The L-Century had the same measurements as the other L-models: 14-3/4" wide and 19-1/4" long. The other differences were the use of maple for the back and sides (instead of mahogany), and of course the eye-catching pearloid material covering the entire fingerboard and headstock.

More detailed information on Gibson’s flat-top guitars can be found in Gibson’s Fabulous Flat-Top Guitars by Eldon Whitford, David Vinopal, and Dan Erlewine.

Those interested in the Chicago World’s Fair of 1933 and1934 can check out encyclopedia.chicagohistory.org.


Dave's Guitar Shop

Dave Rogers’ Collection is tended to by Laun Braithwaite & Tim Mullally Photos by Tim Mullally Dave’s Collection is on display at:

Dave's Guitar Shop

1227 Third Street South

La Crosse, WI 54601

608-785-7704

davesguitar.com

While Annie Clark was named the 26th greatest guitarist of all time by Rolling Stone in 2023, she couldn’t care less about impressing an athletic stamp on either her sound or her image.


Photo by Alex Da Corte

On her eighth studio release, the electroacoustic art-rock guitarist and producer animates an extension of the strange and singular voice she’s been honing since her debut in 2007.

“Did you grow up Unitarian?” Annie Clark asks me. We’re sitting in a control room at Electric Lady Studios in New York’s West Village, and I’ve just explained my personal belief system to her, to see if Clark, aka St. Vincent, might relate and return the favor. After all, does she not possess a kind of sainthood worth inquiring about?

Read MoreShow less
Photo by Jim Rakete

Watch Deep Purple's official music video for "Lazy Sod" from their upcoming album =1.

Read MoreShow less

Vox’s Clyde McCoy wah was arguably the first signature pedal, introduced in 1967. McCoy was a jazz trumpeter, but onomatopoeia inspired the device’s name.

Parsing the (mostly) good and the bad in the world of stompbox endorsements.

In the universe of guitar gear, artist-endorsed products are as common as stars in the night sky. Decades ago, signature pedals only had household names on them, but these days, manufacturers are tailor-making guitar gear for niche guitar players as well, and offering these bespoke creations to the rest of the public, too.

Read MoreShow less

This boutique pedal from Electric Eye Audio is designed to offer sophisticated tone shaping capabilities with two gain controls, Clarity and EBM controls, and a three-knob EQ section.

Read MoreShow less