Rig Rundowns, Gear Reviews, Lessons, Giveaways & More

A few simple chords is all it takes.

Beginner

Beginner

  • Learn to play a 12-bar blues, in three different keys, using one shape.
  • Study an assortment of strumming and picking patterns.
  • Gain a basic understanding of the 12-bar blues form.
{u'media': u'[rebelmouse-document-pdf 17124 site_id=20368559 original_filename="One-ShapeBlues_Jun19.pdf"]', u'file_original_url': u'https://roar-assets-auto.rbl.ms/documents/17124/One-ShapeBlues_Jun19.pdf', u'type': u'pdf', u'id': 17124, u'media_html': u'One-ShapeBlues_Jun19.pdf'}

As usual, there is more to this lesson than the title implies. We will be working with one chord shape at a time, but over the course of the lesson we’ll study three different shapes. The final example in this lesson incorporates all three shapes to demonstrate how a few basic ideas can provide us with infinite possibilities.

It is important to know that for every chord name in this lesson there are countless shapes—also known as fingerings or voicings—available. For this lesson, I chose what I consider to be the most practical and flexible shapes.

Read MoreShow less

John Bohlinger and Thom Bresh backstage filming a Premier Guitar Rig Rundown in 2020.

Here’s a story about the most interesting man in the world.

“The guitar is my first love, my partner in life. We grew up together and we’ll most likely die together.” —Thom Bresh

One of the best benefits of being a musician is that musicians know musicians, and musicians are the most interesting people you’ll ever meet. Albert Einstein, Charles Dickens, Georgia O’Keeffe, the Marx Brothers, Clint Eastwood, Jeff Bridges, Juliette Lewis, Jack Black, and Zooey Deschanel are or were musicians, albeit not full-time.

Read MoreShow less

“If you get caught up too much in divine intervention, you’ll wander around forever waiting for some melody that no one’s ever heard before.”

Photo by Riaz Gomez

Johnny Marr’s latest LP spans influences from New Order to the Staple Singers while staying rooted in his clockwork timing and copious talents as arranger and melodicist.

When the great Ronnie Spector of the Ronettes passed away earlier this year, I thought a lot about Johnny Marr. Marr was moved deeply by the girl groups of the ’60s—their positivity, energy, and the convergence of ecstasy and melancholy in the music. He was even fired up by the audaciousness of their style: The impressive beehive hairdo worn by Spector’s bandmate Estelle Bennett famously inspired the jet-black pile Marr wore at the height of Smiths fame.

Read MoreShow less

Misfits guitarist Doyle Wolfgang Von Frankenstein unveils a new line of strings, collaborating with Josh Vittek of Sheptone.

Read MoreShow less
x