Billy Corgan and Railhammer Pickups Team Up for Signature Model

The unique EQ features a mild midrange bump that imparts a slight "cocked wah" effect.

Troy, MI (March 9, 2016) -- Part of the new Humcutter series, this pickup was developed in collaboration with Billy Corgan of the Smashing Pumpkins. This design combines the clarity and articulation of a P90, with the thick tone and low noise of a humbucker. The unique EQ features a mild midrange bump, imparting a slight "cocked wah pedal" effect (aka "the Sabbath note" per Billy), which gives the tone extra punch and weight even with the heaviest distortion or fuzz. Plus the dual coil Humcutter design means it's hum free! A very versatile pickup that sounds great clean or distorted, and allows the player's personality to shine through. And like all Railhammers, the extra clarity on the wound strings means they also work great with low tuned guitars.

The patent pending Railhammers are designed by award winning guitar industry veteran Joe Naylor. Thin rails under the wound strings sense a narrow section of string, producing a tight, clear tone. Large poles under the plain strings sense a wide section of string, producing a fat, thick tone. This allows players to dial in a tight clear tone on the wound strings without the plain strings sounding thin or sterile. The result is improved clarity and tonal balance across all the strings.

Touch sensitivity, sustain, and harmonic content are also enhanced by the extremely efficient magnetic structure, and the elimination of any moving parts. The strong magnetic field also prevents any dead spots when bending strings (including on the round pole side).

Other features include: universal spacing, German silver cover, brass baseplate, four-conductor wiring with independent ground (allows custom wiring such as phase, series/parallel, etc.) and height tapered rails which contributes to consistent volume across all the strings. Available in chrome or black.

$109 per pickup

For more information:
Railhammer

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Advanced

Beginner

• Understand how to map out the neck in seven positions.
• Learn to combine legato and picking to create long phrases.
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Knowing how to function in different keys is crucial to improvising in any context. One path to fretboard mastery is learning how to move through positions across the neck. Even something as simple as a three-note-per-string major scale can offer loads of options when it’s time to step up and rip. I’m going to outline seven technical sequences, each one focusing on a position of a diatonic major scale. This should provide a fun workout for the fingers and hopefully inspire a few licks of your own.
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