Cort Announces the GB74JJ Bass

The bass features a swamp ash body, VTB-ST pickups, and a Omega bridge.

Seoul, South Korea (June 16, 2017) -- Raising the bar on instrument design often means incorporating cutting-edge features on a time-proven model. That’s what Cort set out to accomplish with its GB Series of electric bass guitars. Within this series, the GB7 models combine a proven body and bridge design with enhanced electronics, machine heads, and more for the best of the past and future. The newest addition to the GB7 line—the 4-string GB74JJ with double jazz pickups—continues the seamless integration of classic and modern in one stunning instrument.

The GB74JJ’s two VTB-ST pickups were carefully chosen with consideration to this instrument’s swamp ash body, and are voiced to deliver a legendary jazz tone. Crafted with winding materials that maximize high and low frequencies, the refined design of these pickups provides a unique noiseless performance. The electronics are also specially engineered, providing for two bands of tone control as well as master volume and pickup blend controls, with the ability to switch from active to passive thanks to a provided push-pull pot.

Players will also note the GB74JJ’s solid construction, starting with the Omega bridge, an important sonic enhancement made from high-density die-cast Zinc that’s rock solid, yet fully adjustable. The countered neck joint on this model provides better fret access and comfort with a sleek look. Both the neck and fingerboard (21-fret, 34’’ scale) are satin maple. Gig ready, the GB74JJ has a trim neckjoint, slimmed-down neckplate and Hipshot Ultralite tuners with a 20:1 gear ratio that makes tuning easy and precise. The tuners’ lightweight construction also helps avoid neck-dive and adds to overall comfort.

Available in two, high-gloss color finishes—AM 4-String Amber and AB 4-String Aqua Blue—the GB74JJ respects the past while representing the future.

MSRP $749 USD

For more information:
Cort Guitars

Multiple modulation modes and malleable voices cement a venerable pedal’s classic status.

Huge range of mellow to immersive modulation sounds. Easy to use. Stereo output. Useful input gain control.

Can sound thin compared to many analog chorus and flange classics.

$149

TC Electronic SCF Gold
tcelectronic.com

4.5
4
4.5
5

When you consider stompboxes that have achieved ubiquity and longevity, images of Tube Screamers, Big Muffs, or Boss’ DD series delays probably flash before your eyes. It’s less likely that TC Electronic’s Stereo Chorus Flanger comes to mind. But when you consider that its fundamental architecture has remained essentially unchanged since 1976 and that it has consistently satisfied persnickety tone hounds like Eric Johnson, it’s hard to not be dazzled by its staying power—or wonder what makes it such an indispensable staple for so many players.

Read More Show less

While Monolord has no shortage of the dark and heavy, guitarist and vocalist Thomas V Jäger comes at it from a perspective more common to pop songsmiths.

Photo by Chad Kelco

Melodies, hooks, clean tones, and no guitar solos. Are we sure this Elliott Smith fan fronts a doom-metal band? (We’re sure!)

Legend has it the name Monolord refers to a friend of the band with the same moniker who lost hearing in his left ear, and later said it didn’t matter if the band recorded anything in stereo, because he could not hear it anyway. It’s a funny, though slightly tragic, bit of backstory, but that handle is befitting in yet another, perhaps even more profound, way. Doom and stoner metal are arguably the torch-bearing subgenres for hard rock guitar players, and if any band seems to hold the keys to the castle at this moment, it’s Monolord.

Read More Show less
x