Electro-Harmonix Announces the B9 Organ Machine

A nine-position switch allows the player to select among different popular organ types.

New York, NY (June 19, 2014) -- With nine finely-tuned presets emulating the legendary organs of the '60s and beyond, the B9 Organ Machine delivers definitive tonewheel and combo organ sounds.

The B9’s layout is straight forward and intuitive. A nine-position switch allows the player to select among different popular organ types. The Organ volume knob controls the overall volume of the Organ preset while Dry volume controls the volume of the untreated instrument level at the Organ Output jack. This enables a player to mix the sound of their original instrument with the organ to create lush layers, or mute it entirely.

A Mod control adjusts the modulation speed. The type of modulation provided is contingent on the preset and matched to it. A Click control was designed to simulate the harmonic percussion effect that is a sonic signature of many classic organs. For maximum authenticity, the click is added to the very first note or chord played and only retriggers when current notes have been released and their amplitude falls below a threshold.

With the B9 Organ Machine, EHX’s goal was to create an affordable, rugged and easy to use pedal that would put undeniable organ sound at a musician’s fingertips. Check out the demo to hear it for yourself. The new B9 Organ Machine comes standard with an EHX 9.6-Volt/DC200mA AC adapter and carries a U.S. list price of $293.73.

For more information:
Electro-Harmonix/a>

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