Electro-Harmonix Releases the Clockworks Rhythm Generator Synthesizer

It can be used as a master clock for sequencers and drum machines and to trigger electronic percussion.

New York, NY (September 11, 2014) -- The Clockworks Rhythm Generator/Synthesizer is a circuit-faithful reissue of the classic product built by Electro-Harmonix in the 1970s, now in a die-cast chassis. Original examples of this rarified pedal have fetched up to £790 at auction! Clockworks can be used as a master clock for sequencers and drum machines, and to trigger electronic percussion products like the vintage EHX Crash Pad drum synth. It doesn’t create sound on its own, but generates pulses to trigger other devices and can set the tempo for a drum machine or sequencer like EHX’s 8 Step Program.

Specs:

  • Works as a master clock for sequencers and drum machines
  • Generates pulses to trigger devices like electronic percussion products
  • Connect up to four devices to the four separate clock channels driven from the same master clock. Creating polyrhythms is fun and easy
  • Master clock can be generated internally by the Clockworks or come from an outside source
  • Fully analog
  • Supplied with an EHX 18VDC/500mA AC Adapter.

The Clockworks carries a U.S. list price of $293.73 and is available now.

For more information:
Electro-Harmonix

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