This transparent overdrive features boosted power rails for extra headroom and definition.

New York, NY (December 16, 2013) -- Electro-Harmonix announces the latest addition to its expanding range of overdrive and distortion pedals: the Soul Food. This transparent overdrive can fatten a guitarist’s tone in all the right places without compromising or changing it.

The Soul Food’s unique design features boosted power rails for extra headroom and definition. Uses range from a clean boost all the way to heavy amp saturation—all achieved without adding coloration. This pedal was built for the tone conscious player who needs to cut through a mix without altering the voice of his or her instrument.

The control layout includes Volume, Treble and Drive knobs. Volume sets the overall output level of the pedal while Drive adjusts the saturation and gain. The Treble control seemingly pulls shimmering upper harmonics out of thin air without sounding shrill. With an internal switch, the player can choose to run the Soul Food in high-quality buffered or true bypass modes to help keep a healthy effect chain. The new Soul Food pedal is housed in a compact die-cast package, is shipped with a 9.6-Volt/DC200mA AC adapter, can be powered by a 9-volt battery and carries a U.S. list price of $83.74.

Watch the company's video demo:

For more information:
Electro-Harmonix

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We’re almost finished with the aging process on our project guitar. Let’s work on the fretboard, nut, and truss rod cover, and prepare the headstock for the last hurrah.

Hello and welcome back to Mod Garage. This month we’ll continue with our relic’ing project, taking a closer look at the front side of the neck and treating the fretboard and the headstock. We’ll work on the front side of the headstock in the next part, but first we must prepare it.

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Diatonic sequences are powerful tools. Here’s how to use them wisely.

Advanced

Beginner

• Understand how to map out the neck in seven positions.
• Learn to combine legato and picking to create long phrases.
• Develop a smooth attack—even at high speeds.

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Knowing how to function in different keys is crucial to improvising in any context. One path to fretboard mastery is learning how to move through positions across the neck. Even something as simple as a three-note-per-string major scale can offer loads of options when it’s time to step up and rip. I’m going to outline seven technical sequences, each one focusing on a position of a diatonic major scale. This should provide a fun workout for the fingers and hopefully inspire a few licks of your own.
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