Ernie Ball Music Man Announces New Sabre Guitar

The model features a lightweight Okoume body, thick carved maple top, and custom Ernie Ball Music Man humbucking pickups.

San Luis Obispo, CA (April 27, 2020) -- Ernie Ball Music Man, the world’s leading manufacturer of guitar strings, musical instruments and accessories, is proud to announce the availability of the newest model in its instrument offerings with the all-new Sabre guitar.

The new Sabre guitar features a lightweight Okoume body, thick carved maple top and custom Ernie Ball Music Man humbucking pickups, delivering lively, dynamic sound with striking clarity and sustain. The Sabre features a book-matched premium top adorned with natural binding, which elegantly highlights the beauty of the figured maple wood grain. Crafted with a slender, contoured body and slightly wider nut width, the Sabre guitar provides unmatched comfort and playability. It is also comes equipped with a roasted figured maple neck, and a choice of rosewood, ebony, or maple fingerboard, Schaller locking tuners, a 5-way switch, and Ernie Ball Music Man’s super smooth modern tremolo system.

The Sabre will be available in four finishes including Cobra, Boujee Burst, Honeysuckle, and Blue Moonstone. It is now available, with retail pricing starting at $3199.

Features:

  • Okoume body
  • 3/8-inch thick carved flame maple top trimmed with natural binding
  • Roasted figured maple neck
  • Wider nut width (1 11/16-inch)
  • Two custom Ernie Ball Music Man designed humbucking pickups
  • Super smooth modern Ernie Ball Music Man Tremolo system
  • Schaller locking tuners
  • Chrome hardware (black hardware with Cobra finish)
  • 22 stainless steel frets
  • The fretboard is maple, rosewood, or ebony depending on finish

For more information:
Ernie Ball Music Man

John 5 on How He Gets Old-School Tones from His Metal-Friendly Tele | The Big 5

Plus, find out which guitar hero the Rob Zombie sideman “begs and pleads” with you to listen to.

Read More Show less

Intermediate

Beginner

  • Develop a better sense of subdivisions.
  • Understand how to play "over the bar line."
  • Learn to target chord tones in a 12-bar blues.
{u'media': u'[rebelmouse-document-pdf 12793 site_id=20368559 original_filename="DeepPockets-Nov21.pdf"]', u'file_original_url': u'https://roar-assets-auto.rbl.ms/documents/12793/DeepPockets-Nov21.pdf', u'type': u'pdf', u'id': 12793, u'media_html': u'DeepPockets-Nov21.pdf'}

Playing in the pocket is the most important thing in music. Just think about how we talk about great music: It's "grooving" or "swinging" or "rocking." Nobody ever says, "I really enjoyed their use of inverted suspended triads," or "their application of large-interval pentatonic sequences was fascinating." So, whether you're playing live or recording, time is everyone's responsibility, and you must develop your ability to play in the pocket.

Read More Show less
x