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Mooer Micro Looper II Review

Mooer Micro Looper

The updated loop pedal from Mooer is a user-friendly blast at a budget price.

Easy to use. Intuitive controls and layout. Auto record mode is handy.

Multiple layers can get muddy.

Mooer Micro Looper II
mooeraudio.com

4
4.5
5
4.5



Within 5 minutes of plugging in Mooer’s Micro Looper II, the updated model of the company’s spartan Micro Looper, I knew everything there was to know about it. That’s thanks in part to a simple, smart control suite that eschews digital displays—the direction in which many loopers seem to be moving—in favor of a central rotary dial that navigates between the 16 available save slots in three banks, which are accessed via a 3-way toggle. A small level knob lets you simmer loops more quietly, or crank them with a 6 dB boost. Another mini knob controls the threshold at which the auto record function is engaged. Auto record is toggled on and off via the rubber LED in the pedal’s center that also tells you whether you’re in record, playback, or stop mode, depending on its color and pattern. The included manual did a fine job articulating all of these parameters.

Each loop offers up to 10 minutes recording time and unlimited layering in each loop slot, and I put those parameters to the test with no disruptive issues or glitches. Things got a wee bit foggy once more than four layers of guitar were introduced. But my Dr. Z’s chiming cleans were looped in perpetuity through the 2x10 speakers with what felt like very little loss of fidelity. And the Looper II’s auto record function worked seamlessly at all stops on the threshold spectrum. It’s a very welcome feature to have on hand, and I found myself opting for it as a quick fix for microscopic but annoying timing issues. For the price, it doesn’t get much better than this.


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The pickup selector switch might be in a slightly awkward position for some players.

$2,029

PRS S2 Vela
prsguitars.com

4.5
5
5
4.5

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