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Gibson Introduces Gothic Mortes Les Paul and SG Guitars

The Gothic Mortes guitars feature dark, gothic design and new Gibson active humbuckers.

Nashville, TN (March 4, 2011) -- Gibson has released two new American-made models under the Gothic Mortes names: a Les Paul Studio and an SG.

Both guitars feature Gibson USA's new GEM (Gibson Electronics Manufacturing) active pickups. Made in the image of Gibson's own PAF ("Patent Applied For") humbuckers, the GEMs have Alnico II magnets and coils wound with 42 AWG enamel-coated wire. They also include active electronics for greatly improved output and extremely low-noise performance. The GEMs are powered by a single 9-volt battery that yields approximately 1500 hours of service. They have a voice and playing feel akin to Gibson's popular Burstbuckers, with all of that humbucker's characteristic "smooth with edge" tonal response, and they are immune to the loading effects of volume and tone potentiometers. They offer an extremely fast transient response for unprecedented articulation (yet with all the classic humbucker warmth and smoothness), and are extremely compatible with both effects pedals and clean amp settings. Suitable for all styles of music, the GEM active pickups represent a huge leap forward in performance and versatility.



Gothic Mortes Les Paul Studio
The skeleton of the Les Paul Studio Gothic Morte is crafted from the same ingredients that have helped to make the Les Paul legendary for nearly 60 years. A carved maple top is joined to a mahogany body that has been strategically chambered for improved resonance and weight relief, and a solid mahogany neck carved to a comfortable rounded "50s Studio" profile is glued in Gibson's time-tested tradition. The most exciting ingredient of the entire tonewood package, however, is the exotic African Obeche used for the guitar's fingerboard. A dark, dense alternative to Ebony, African Obeche is fully sustainable. As used on the SG Gothic Morte, the African Obeche fingerboard carries no inlays or binding to extend the model's radical styling. In addition to the guitar's Satin Ebony nitrocellulose finish, the Les Paul Studio Gothic Morte wears a black Tune-o-matic bridge with a black stopbar tailpiece, black Grover tuners, and a black Corian nut which has been precision cut on the PLEK for optimum intonation. MSRP $1599.


Gothic Mortes SG
Comprising the traditional solid-mahogany body and neck that has provided a rich, resonant platform for SG models for 50 years, the SG Gothic Morte introduces an exotic new fingerboard wood, African Obeche. A dark, dense alternative to Ebony, African Obeche is fully sustainable. As used on the Les Paul Gothic Morte, the African Obeche fingerboard carries no inlays or binding to extend the model's "none more black" styling. In addition to the guitar's Satin Ebony nitrocellulose finish, the SG Morte wears a black Tune-o-matic bridge with a black stopbar tailpiece, black Grover tuners, and a black Corian nut which has been precision cut on the PLEK for optimum intonation. MSRP $1599.

Both models include a padded Gibson gigbag and owner's manual, and are covered by Gibson's Limited Lifetime Warranty and 24/7/365 Customer Service.

For more information:
Gibson

Source: Press Release

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