The new collection includes flattops, resonator guitars, archtops, and more.

G9202 Honey Dipper Special, Round Neck

Scottsdale, AZ (January 8, 2014) -- Gretsch is proud to release an all new and improved lineup of banjos, mandolins, resonators and guitars in the 2014 Roots Collection, the eclectic family of instruments that transports players to a bygone era. The most distinctive features of each individual model are listed below:

G9550 New Yorker Archtop

  • Arched solid spruce top with laminated maple sides and arched back
  • Vintage-Style “V”-shaped mahogany neck profile
  • Rosewood fingerboard
  • 25” scale
  • Compensated rosewood bridge with trapeze tailpiece
  • Sunburst Finish

G9515 Jim Dandy Flat Top

  • Agathis top and sides
  • “C”-shaped nato neck
  • Rosewood fingerboard
  • 24” scale
  • Rosewood top-load bridge with compensated PPS saddle
  • Semi-gloss Coral Sunburst finish

G9231 Bobtail Steel Square-Neck A.E.

  • Steel body
  • Square-shaped mahogany neck
  • Rosewood fingerboard
  • 25” scale
  • Gretsch Ampli-Sonic Spider resonator cone and bridge
  • Fishman Nashville Resophonic pickup
  • Semi-gloss clear top coat finish

G9221 Bobtail Steel Round-Neck A.E.

  • Steel body
  • Medium “V”-shaped mahogany neck
  • Rosewood fingerboard
  • 25” scale
  • Gretsch Ampli-Sonic Spider resonator cone and bridge
  • Fishman Nashville Resophonic pickup
  • Semi-gloss clear top coat finish

G9212 Honey Dipper Special, Square Neck

  • Bell brass body top, back and sides
  • Square-shaped mahogany neck
  • Rosewood fingerboard
  • 25” scale
  • Gretsch Ampli-Sonic Biscuit resonator cone and bridge
  • Weathered “Delta Blue” body finish

G9202 Honey Dipper Special, Round Neck

  • Bell brass body top, back and sides
  • Medium “V”-shaped mahogany neck
  • Rosewood fingerboard
  • 25” scale
  • Gretsch Ampli-Sonic Biscuit resonator cone and bridge
  • Weathered “Delta Blue” body finish

For more information:
Gretsch Guitars

Rig Rundown: Adam Shoenfeld

Whether in the studio or on solo gigs, the Nashville session-guitar star holds a lotta cards, with guitars and amps for everything he’s dealt.

Adam Shoenfeld has helped shape the tone of modern country guitar. How? Well, the Nashville-based session star, producer, and frontman has played on hundreds of albums and 45 No. 1 country hits, starting with Jason Aldean’s “Hicktown,” since 2005. Plus, he’s found time for several bands of his own as well as the first studio album under his own name, All the Birds Sing, which drops January 28.

Read More Show less

Diatonic sequences are powerful tools. Here’s how to use them wisely.

Advanced

Beginner

• Understand how to map out the neck in seven positions.
• Learn to combine legato and picking to create long phrases.
• Develop a smooth attack—even at high speeds.

{u'media': u'[rebelmouse-document-pdf 13574 site_id=20368559 original_filename="7Shred-Jan22.pdf"]', u'file_original_url': u'https://roar-assets-auto.rbl.ms/documents/13574/7Shred-Jan22.pdf', u'type': u'pdf', u'id': 13574, u'media_html': u'7Shred-Jan22.pdf'}
Knowing how to function in different keys is crucial to improvising in any context. One path to fretboard mastery is learning how to move through positions across the neck. Even something as simple as a three-note-per-string major scale can offer loads of options when it’s time to step up and rip. I’m going to outline seven technical sequences, each one focusing on a position of a diatonic major scale. This should provide a fun workout for the fingers and hopefully inspire a few licks of your own.
Read More Show less
x