Kiesel Guitars Announces Vader Series Headless Basses

Radiused single-coil pickups and active electronics are among the many custom shop options.

San Diego, CA (November 9, 2015) -- The new Kiesel Vader Series Headless Basses feature an aggressive, compact beveled body, which provide modern looks with comfortable playing. Generous forearm and belly cuts further add to the satisfying ergonomics of the bass. A sculpted lower cutaway further accentuates the styling of the instrument, while allowing easy access to the 24-fret, standard in 34" scale with a 30" short-scale option. Our chambered body option further reduces the already light weight of the instrument. The standard body wood is alder, with an Eastern hard rock maple neck-through design. Dual High Modulus carbon-fiber rods, along with a 2-way fully adjustable truss rod make the neck extremely stable and allows you to adjust the action exactly the way you want it, regardless of your playing style.

Other features of the Vader Series basses include a standard Hipshot bridge with exclusive Kiesel locking nut/headpiece assembly, allowing the use of standard bass strings. Radiused-top RADHV humbuckers are standard, with passive electronics - master volume, tone and pickup blend controls. Radiused single coil pickups and active electronics are also available. Hundreds of Custom Shop options, including body and neck woods, top woods, fingerboard woods, fretwire, inlays and much more allow you to design your new Vader bass exactly the way you want it. Like all Kiesel and Carvin Guitars, the Vader Series is proudly made in the USA at our southern California facility.

For more information:
Kiesel

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