Both the Prophet (White) and False Prophet (Black) models are built for aggressive tones, playing and appearance.

Elkridge, MD (October 30, 2012) - Oktober Guitars today announces the release of the new Prophet guitar. Both the Prophet (White) and False Prophet (Black) models are built for aggressive tones, playing and appearance to deliver a message loud and clear. This latest addition to the production line is now available worldwide and can be ordered directly from the Oktober Guitars website.

The Prophets are constructed of a mahogany body and set in neck with a string through body, TOM style bridge and graphite nut to allow players complete flexibility to play in either standard of dropped tunings. The neck has a 24 fret, 24 ¾ inch scale, bound, ebony fretboard without any inlay. Players can dial in a wide assortment of tones through the pair of Blockhead humbuckers, single volume and single tone control knobs and a three way pickup selector switch. Each guitar ships with a form fitted case and receives a complete professional set up in the Maryland factory before delivery. The Prophet is only available in white (Prophet) or black (False Prophet).

Standard Options Include:
• Bound mahogany neck
• Mahogany body
• Set neck construction
• Premium ebony fretboard with no inlay
• 24 fret neck
• 24 ¾ inch scale
• String-thru body with TOM style bridge
• Graphite nut
• Oktober Blockhead pickups
• Form-fitting Oktober hard shell case
• Prophet in pearl white finish, False Prophet in pearl black finish

Factory Direct: $579.00 USD
List price: $1447.00 USD

For more information:
Oktober Guitars

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