Peavey Releases Headliner 1000 Bass Amp

The Headliner is a 1000-watt head that packs power and tone into a lightweight package.

Meriden, Mississippi (February 08, 2016) -- Peavey Electronics’ Headliner 1000 is now available for purchase through dealers and distributors worldwide. The 1000-watt rack-mountable bass amplifier head packs power and tone into a lightweight 10lb. package.

With matching enclosures, the Peavey Headliner 1000 features a seven-band graphic EQ spaced at optimized frequencies, with each slider offering 15 dB of cut and boost to provide comprehensive tone shaping frequencies optimized for bass guitar. Players can use the graphic EQ in conjunction with the low and high shelving-type tone controls or bypass the graphic EQ entirely.

A built-in optical compressor with level control and bypass allows players to add just the right amount of compression to the mix. The crunch feature adds a vintage tube effect that distorts only the high frequencies, preserving the all-important fat low end. The amp also features bright and contour switches, an effects loop, master volume and headphone out. The compressor and crunch features are footswitch selectable.

The Headliner 1000 features a built-in XLR direct interface that routes the signal to the house sound system or recording device, and an active/passive pickup switch that compensates for active instrument inputs. Peavey’s exclusive DDT™ speaker protection circuitry senses the onset of clipping and responds with slight limiting that allows the amp to retain tone, headroom and dynamics (bypass included). At 1 ½ rack space, the Headliner measures at 2.813” tall, 17.375” wide, and 12.5” deep and has a combination twist-lock and 1/4” external speaker jacks.

Designed to complement the Headliner 1000 amplifier, the Peavey Headliner 410, Headliner 210, Headliner 115, and Headliner 112 bass enclosures are made with premium loudspeakers and components for superior punch, tone and reliability.

For more information:
Peavey Electronics

Rig Rundown: Adam Shoenfeld

Whether in the studio or on his solo gigs, the Nashville session-guitar star holds a lotta cards, with guitars and amps for everything he’s dealt.

Adam Shoenfeld has helped shape the tone of modern country guitar. How? Well, the Nashville-based session star, producer, and frontman has played on hundreds of albums and 45 No. 1 country hits, starting with Jason Aldean’s “Hicktown,” since 2005. Plus, he’s found time for several bands of his own as well as the first studio album under his own name, All the Birds Sing, which drops January 28.

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Diatonic sequences are powerful tools. Here’s how to use them wisely.

Advanced

Beginner

• Understand how to map out the neck in seven positions.
• Learn to combine legato and picking to create long phrases.
• Develop a smooth attack—even at high speeds.

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Knowing how to function in different keys is crucial to improvising in any context. One path to fretboard mastery is learning how to move through positions across the neck. Even something as simple as a three-note-per-string major scale can offer loads of options when it’s time to step up and rip. I’m going to outline seven technical sequences, each one focusing on a position of a diatonic major scale. This should provide a fun workout for the fingers and hopefully inspire a few licks of your own.
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