The new amps include Two Notes technology, four independent channels, noise gates, and digital reverbs.

Winnipeg, Manitoba (November 12, 2020) -- Redefining the award-winning Canadian high-gain titans. The Revv Generator MKIII Series took 4 years of research & development based on feedback from world-class touring artists, session guitarists, & audio engineers. Featuring a plethora of tonal updates, all-new noise gate & digital reverb, & integrating advanced Two notes Audio Engineering virtual cabinet & reactive load technology, Revv Amplification is committed to bringing you the most complete amplifier experience available.

Revv’s MKIII Series 120 & 100 watt heads are available as the Generator 120 with all 4 channels, or the 100P & 100R, which each feature a single high gain channel.

The Generator MKIII Series features:

  • Go Direct with Two notes Torpedo-embedded Stereo XLR Output
  • Utilize Virtual Cabs & Mics, Twin Tracker Stereo Doubler, Reverbs, & More
  • 4 All-Tube Independent-EQ Multi-Voice Channels Take Your Tone from Clean to Scream
  • 4 Channel Generator 120. Available as 3 Independent EQ Channel 100P & 100R Models
  • Updated High Gain Purple & Red Channel Voicings & New Cut Switch
  • New Clean Blue Channel Wide Switch & 3 Crunch Green Channel Drive Modes
  • Built-in State-of-the-Art Noise Gate & Digital Reverb (Both Fully Bypassable)
  • Dual Master Volumes, Presence & Depth Controls, & Power Scaling Down to 10 Watts
  • Fully Programmable with MIDI or Included Footswitch. Two notes Editable via Bluetooth
  • Manufactured in Canada to Rugged Quality Standards. 5 - 12AX7, 4 - 6L6GC

The Generator 120 MKIII is $3299 & the 100P & 100R are $2699. They can be pre-purchased through many fine dealers or directly at www.revvamplification.com starting November 12 2020.

Watch the company's video demo:

For more information:
Revv Amplification

This rare English Tonemaster was made circa 1957.

The Valco-produced English Tonemaster is a rare, lap-steel-inspired gem from the 1950s—when genres and guitar design were fluid.

The 1950s were a peculiar time for the electric guitar. Innovators, designers, and tinkerers were pushing the boundaries of the instrument, while musicians were experimenting with various playing techniques and sounds. There was an evolution of sorts (or de-evolution, depending on your slant) from solidbody “sit-down” guitars, like pedal and lap steels, to “stand-up” or “upright” solidbody electrics. If you look at an early Fender catalog—let’s say from 1953—you’ll see the Telecaster (and Esquire), the Precision Bass, and then a whole bunch of steel guitars. There was a shift underway, and many manufacturers began to blur the lines of what a guitar should look, sound, and play like.

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