Rotosound Launches Ultramag Strings

The British string manufacturer is launching a new range of high-end guitar strings.

Sevenoaks, Kent (January 3, 2019) -- Iconic British string manufacturer, Rotosound, is launching a new range of high-end guitar strings sets at the forthcoming NAMM 2019 show in Anaheim, California.

Best-known for its wide range of mid-price strings, the launch of the new Ultramag sets, made with Type 52 Alloy.

The sets will initially be available in .009, .010 and .011 gauges for electric guitar. Samples will be available to test at the forthcoming NAMM Show, with a launch scheduled for February 2019.

Rotosound materials expert, John Doughty, explained the science behind the strings, saying: “With a composition of 52% Nickel and 48% iron, this highly magnetic string will certainly accentuate those middles and lows over their steel counterparts. Designed for use in the aerospace industry and high-end electronics, the low co-efficient of expansion will help maintain tuning in wide ranging environments. With its corrosion resistant properties and its unique blend of sound it is a truly a string for the discerning player seeking that extra tonal character.”

Chairman, Jason How, explained the thinking behind the move: “This is an area of the market that we have not really competed in before, but we have been working on creating the right kind of product for some time. We’re very pleased with what we now have and I believe that guitarists and dealers are going to love these strings which are well worth that small extra investment that will take their tone and margins to a new level.”

For more information on the new Ultramag range or to try them out, visit stand 4602 at NAMM Show 2019 at the Anaheim Convention Centre.

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Rotosound

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Advanced

Beginner

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