The Buffer utilizes only the highest quality components such as: low noise audiophile Op-Amps, Glass Epoxy PCB, and an machined billet aluminum enclosure.

Lake Elsinore, CA (December 10, 2012) -- Suhr has announced the release of a new, compact buffer pedal. Here are the details from the company:

Today's players demand quality, reliability and great tone. To ensure that your investment in tone is preserved throughout your signal chain, the Suhr Buffer utilizes only the highest quality components such as: low noise audiophile Op-Amps, Glass Epoxy PCB, and an machined billet aluminum enclosure.

Designed with the same attention to detail as Suhr’s other products -- including the Badger, Hand Wired and OD series amplifiers – the Suhr Buffer is a transparent signal buffer/line driver which is an essential tool designed to preserve your instrument’s tone. Tone loss occurs as a result of signal degradation, commonly caused by long cable run, or the use of multiple instrument cables - such as you would find on a pedal board. To solve this, the Suhr Buffer employs unity buffering to reverse the effects of capacitance without affecting your instruments tone or output level.

Suhr recommends placing the Buffer as the first device in your signal chain. If you are using a vintage fuzz pedal such as a Fuzz Face® or Tone Bender® Suhr recommends placing the Buffer after those devices to retain their character and relationship with your instrument's electronics.

The Suhr Buffer offers a variety of features for every playing situation. The Buffer is built using the highest quality components and equipped with two independent outputs, all in a compact, solid, aluminum enclosure. One output (ISO) is isolated and utilizes a transformer to eliminate noise from ground looping and features a 180º Phase Reversal switch to keep your signal in phase when splitting between two amplifiers.

Features:

  • DC INLET: Use a compatible 9-18Vdc with a center negative power supply.
  • INPUT: Instrument Input, use this jack to connect your instrument.
  • OUTPUT: Primary output, use this jack to connect to an amplifier or effect device.
  • ISO OUTPUT (transformer isolated): Secondary output, use this to split your instrument's signal to an additional amplifier or sound source.
  • PHASE SWITCH (ø): The Phase Switch reverses the polarity of the Buffer’s ISO Output by 180º. Activate this switch to keep both output sources in phase. OUT- Normal (non-reversed) IN- Signals phase reversed by 180º

Specs:

  • Input Impedance: 1M Ω
  • Output Impedance: 150 Ω
  • Power Connector: 9v
  • Operating Voltage: 4.5Vdc - 18v
  • Maximum Voltage: 20Vdc
  • Over Voltage Protection: Yes
  • Current Consumption: <5ma
  • Dimensions: L- 2.87” x W- 2.53” x D- 1.23”
  • Weight: .379 lbs.
  • ROHS Compliant: Yes

Watch a video demo from Suhr:

For more information:
Suhr

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