Each Pro Series instrument is carefully hand-crafted in the foothills of the Japanese Alps.

Scottsdale, AZ (October 1, 2012) – Takamine celebrates the introduction of its new Pro Series 1, Pro Series 2, and Pro Series 3 acoustic-electric guitars. Each Pro Series instrument is carefully hand-crafted in the foothills of the Japanese Alps. There, dedicated craftspeople create instruments of unique beauty and sonic excellence.

The seven new Pro Series 1 and Pro Series 2 models include the P1D, P1DC, P1JC, P1JC-12, P1M, P1NC, P2DC steel-string acoustic/electric guitars.

All Pro Series 1 guitars feature a solid cedar top, sapele back and sides, “X” bracing, and smooth gloss top with satin finish neck, back and sides. All feature a mahogany neck with rosewood fretboard, a pin-less rosewood bridge for easy string changes, a split bone saddle for faultless intonation, a bone nut and chrome machine heads. On-board electronics include the renowned Takamine Palathetic pickup and the latest-generation CT4B II three-band preamplifier. The Pro Series 2 model features the same specifications as the Series 1 guitars, but with a solid spruce top instead of cedar.

The P1D non-cutaway 6-string, P1DC cutaway dreadnought, P1JC jumbo cutaway 6-string, and P1JC-12 jumbo cutaway 12-string guitars provide full-size Takamine acoustic sound and electric performance.

The P1M orchestra-style model offers versatile dynamics and characteristically strong midrange with elegant styling and smooth playability.

The P1NC delivers full and balanced tone from a classic Takamine NEX/grand auditorium-style body with an elegant Venetian cutaway.

The P2DC offers a solid spruce top with classic Takamine tone and playability, great projection, balance and harmonic richness.

MSRPs range from $1374.99 to $1574.99.

The seven new Pro Series 3 models include the P3D, P3DC, P3DC-12, P3MC, P3NC, P3NY steel-string and P3FCN classical acoustic/electric guitars.

All Pro Series 3 guitars feature a solid cedar top, solid sapele back and sapele sides, scalloped hand-cut “X” bracing for optimum voicing, a smooth, comfortable all-satin finish and artful wood marquetry. All feature a mahogany neck with rosewood fretboard, a pin-less rosewood bridge for easy string changes, a split bone saddle for faultless intonation, and a bone nut and gold machine heads with amber buttons. On-board electronics include the renowned Takamine Palathetic pickup and the latest-generation CT4B II three-band preamplifier.

The P3D non-cutaway 6-string, P3DC cutaway 6-string, and P3DC-12 cutaway 12-string guitars provide full-size Takamine acoustic sound, style and performance, employing resonant tone woods, elegant appointments and state-of-the-art electronics.

The P3MC orchestra-style model offers versatile dynamics and characteristically strong midrange with elegant styling and smooth playability.

The P3NC delivers the finest acoustic sound, style and performance from a classic Takamine NEX/grand auditorium-style body with an elegant Venetian cutaway.

The performance of the P3NY “New Yorker” parlor-style acoustic belies its diminutive size by offering a clear, full-bodied voice resounding with sweetness and character.

Takamine’s long history in classical guitar construction is embodied in the P3FCN contemporary nylon string acoustic/electric, designed to deliver classical nylon string tone in modern live and recording environments.

MSRPs range from $1594.99 to $1724.99.

For more information:
www.takamine.com

On Black Midi's Cavalcade, Geordie Greep’s fretwork is an example of the 6-string as a capable component as much as a solo instrument, never completely stealing the show.

Popular music and mainstream tastes may be more fractured than ever, but the guitar continues to thrive.

As we soft launch into the new year, I’m not waiting for the requisite guitar obituary in the news. It’s not going to happen again anytime soon. Why? Because as far as the mainstream media is concerned, our beloved instrument is not only dead, it's irrelevant to the point of not even being an afterthought. When the New York Times published their most recent albums of the year list, there was barely a guitar-based recording to be found. Still, there is not only hope, but also cause for jubilation.

Read More Show less

Diatonic sequences are powerful tools. Here’s how to use them wisely.

Advanced

Beginner

• Understand how to map out the neck in seven positions.
• Learn to combine legato and picking to create long phrases.
• Develop a smooth attack—even at high speeds.

{u'media': u'[rebelmouse-document-pdf 13574 site_id=20368559 original_filename="7Shred-Jan22.pdf"]', u'file_original_url': u'https://roar-assets-auto.rbl.ms/documents/13574/7Shred-Jan22.pdf', u'type': u'pdf', u'id': 13574, u'media_html': u'7Shred-Jan22.pdf'}
Knowing how to function in different keys is crucial to improvising in any context. One path to fretboard mastery is learning how to move through positions across the neck. Even something as simple as a three-note-per-string major scale can offer loads of options when it’s time to step up and rip. I’m going to outline seven technical sequences, each one focusing on a position of a diatonic major scale. This should provide a fun workout for the fingers and hopefully inspire a few licks of your own.
Read More Show less
x