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Tech 21’s Boost RVB Undergoes Update and Makeover

Tech 21 updated the pedal''s look and changed the Rumble control to Modulation.

Clifton, NJ (June 19, 2012) – Tech 21 has updated their Boost RVB analog reverb emulator pedal, changing the former Rumble control to Modulation. This gently modulates the pre-delay of the reverb for additional dimensionality.

With the recent expansion of their Boost Series pedals, Tech 21 has also changed the look of the Boost RVB to complement the line. The Boost RVB features a clean Boost function for up to 9dB of added volume. With boost and reverb in a single pedal, solos jump out of the mix. Designed with user-tweakable, “lo-fi” analog technology, you can manipulate the controls to infuse degrees of warmth and life characteristic of vintage reverbs. This circuitry intentionally injects the inherent imperfections of vintage units, which is what makes them so seductive and nostalgic.

A single, continuously-variable Time control provides a full sweep of size from short to long. Mix (ranging from 100% dry to 100% wet), Feedback, Tone and Level controls are 100% ana- log for authentic, organic sounds. When switching into bypass mode, the Trails function allows the reverb signal to decay naturally, rather than stopping abruptly.

The Boost RVB is engineered so the user can explore and custom tailor such reverb styles as spring, plate and natural room/hall ambiance. Other features include 1megOhm high-imped- ance 1/4” input, 1kOhm low-impedance 1/4” output, custom silent-switching actuator, sturdy metal construction. Operable with 9V alkaline battery (not included) or optional DC power sup- ply (Tech 21 Model #DC2).

For more information, visit:
www.tech21nyc.com

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Photo courtesy of Guitar Point (guitarpoint.de)

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