The Loar Introduces the new LO-215 and 216 Guitars

The LO-215 and 216 from The Loar are unique flat top offerings that give players the chance to sample everything great about a small body instrument, but still benefit from the extra volume of a longer scale.

Hayward, CA (Jan 19, 2012) — The Loar introduces the LO-215 and 216, two small body single-0 guitars with a 25.4” dreadnought scale length for extra projection.

The LO-215 and 216 from The Loar are unique flat top offerings that give players the chance to sample everything great about a small body instrument, but still benefit from the extra volume of a longer scale. The LO-215 starts with a solid Sitka spruce top on a classic 0-style body. The dreadnought scale length means that the strings have greater excursion, resulting in more punch and projection than you’d expect from a small-body guitar. The Sitka spruce combines with the flamed maple back and sides for a bright, sweet tone for any style of music. Our 1-11/16” bone nut is comfortable for either fingerpicking or strumming, and the vintage-style Golden Age tuning machines keep the 215 in tune through extended playing sessions. The ivory body binding and bound headstock give the LO-215 a refined, classic look that complements the vintage sunburst finish and firestripe pickguard.

The LO-216 guitar is built with all of the same features, but with mahogany back and sides for players who prefer a slightly darker tone. We’ve finished the mahogany models in either natural or classic black, for a historic look but different enough to stand out from the crowd. The black especially pops against the vintage firestripe pickguard.

The LO-215 with maple back and sides is available for $374.99, while the mahogany LO-216 is available for $359.99.

More information:
www.theloar.com

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