Wampler Pedals and UK fusion guitarist Tom Quayle team up to create the Dual Fusion.

From Wampler's website:

Sometime in mid 2011 we received an email from Tom Quayle showing an interest in our pedals. So, after some discussion Tom bought a Euphoria and a Paisley Drive. From the moment he plugged them in, his tone had been taken a huge step forward.

When playing high energy Fusion, you need dirt that follows every move you make. It needs to allow the guitar to work and respond perfectly, and with Wampler Pedals, Tom found this.

When we got to meet Tom in person that following January in NAMM, a discussion took place where Tom told us what he loved about that combination and what wasn't quite working. We loved his thoughts. At the show, a concept was born that took just over 12 months to be realized. Once you get to know Tom, you notice two things. Firstly, his playing is out of this world. His knowledge of this fretboard and immaculate phrasing makes him one of the stand out Fusion guitarists playing today. Secondly, he's just a good guy. Some may say he's a Gentleman; basically - he's the type of player, the type of person, we like and the type of person we are proud to work closely with.

So, what was that idea? It was quite simple (well, it appeared that way). Take those two circuits, highlight the most usable tones, modify them extensively to ensure that they stack perfectly and then put them in the the same box. Also, make the stacking switchable... C1 into C2, or C2 into C1. While you are there, seperate them with dedicated inputs/outputs should you use a looper switching system. Basically, make it as versatile and useable as possible.

Upon receiving the first proto type, Tom said "The major improvement is just how amp-like the response is. In that department I have never played a pedal that is as good as this. It sounds exactly like a gainy tube amp and feels like one too. It's very exciting and fun to play through - you totally forget that you're playing a pedal."

The Tom Quayle signature Dual Fusion. Coming soon from Wampler Pedals.

For more information:
Wampler
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