1957 Gretsch 6022 Rancher
A 1957 Gretsch 6022 Rancher, serial number 21465

The Rancher was a 17"-wide jumbo acoustic with a triangular soundhole based on Gretsch’s earlier 125F, but with Western-themed decorations similar to the Chet Atkins 6120, 6121, and the 6130 Round Up.

The 6130 Round Up introduced its most famous flattop—the Rancher—in 1954. The Rancher was a 17"-wide jumbo acoustic with a triangular soundhole based on Gretsch’s earlier 125F, but with Western-themed decorations similar to the Chet Atkins 6120, 6121, and the 6130 Round Up. The model boasted a Golden Red finish, and you can see one of these eye-catching guitars being violently strummed by Paul Peek of Gene Vincent’s Blue Caps in the classic 1956 film The Girl Can’t Help It.

The stunning orange 1957 behemoth spotlighted this month has the features typical to the model’s evolution that year. These include an extremely figured maple back and sides, large triangular rosewood bridge supporting an adjustable rosewood saddle, a “G” brand, a 25 1/2"-scale rosewood fretboard on a maple neck, pearloid humped-block fretboard inlays (replacing the original block inlays engraved with cow and cactus designs), a horseshoe headstock inlay (replacing the original steer’s head), and a plain gold pickguard (replacing the earlier tortoiseshell ’guard).


The large triangular rosewood bridge and adjustable rosewood saddle are among this instrument’s unique features.

On April 20, 1957, the guitar was originally purchased new for $275, including case and strap, at Zadworny Accordion Studio in St. Paul, Minnesota. A trade-in allowance of $65 was given for a Harmony Monterey guitar, leaving a balance of $210. The original hang tag, Gretsch Guitar Guarantee, polish cloth, and strap have been preserved in great condition inside the case.


Gretsch offered a lifetime guarantee against defects in workmanship or materials to the original owner.

More information and photos of Ranchers and other Gretsch guitars can be found in Gretsch: The Guitars of the Fred Gretsch Company by Jay Scott.

Original price: $275
Current estimated market value: $3500


Dave ’s Guitar Shop
Dave Rogers’ collection is tended by Laun Braithwaite and Tim Mullally and is on display at:
Dave’s Guitar Shop
1227 Third Street South
La Crosse, WI 54601
davesguitar.com
Photos by Mullally and text by Braithwaite.

It’s ok for a guitar to not sound like a guitar.

As much as we all love juicy, organic guitar tones, it can be just as inspiring to go the opposite way. Combining various modulation effects, envelope filters, oscillators, and more can result in sounds that owe more to Kraftwerk than Led Zeppelin.

Read More Show less

While Monolord has no shortage of the dark and heavy, guitarist and vocalist Thomas V Jäger comes at it from a perspective more common to pop songsmiths.

Photo by Chad Kelco

Melodies, hooks, clean tones, and no guitar solos. Are we sure this Elliott Smith fan fronts a doom-metal band? (We’re sure!)

Legend has it the name Monolord refers to a friend of the band with the same moniker who lost hearing in his left ear, and later said it didn’t matter if the band recorded anything in stereo, because he could not hear it anyway. It’s a funny, though slightly tragic, bit of backstory, but that handle is befitting in yet another, perhaps even more profound, way. Doom and stoner metal are arguably the torch-bearing subgenres for hard rock guitar players, and if any band seems to hold the keys to the castle at this moment, it’s Monolord.

Read More Show less
x