Little by Little is an ambitious double album full of everything from delicate Beatles-inspired fingerpicking to the barn-burning instrumentals that have become a cornerstone of Tommy Emmanuel''s live shows.

Tommy Emmanuel, C.G.P.
Little by Little
Favored Nations



From the opening notes of “Halfway Home,” Tommy Emmanuel bowls you over with his amazing technique and his ability to craft a melody that sticks in your head. Little by Little is an ambitious double album full of everything from delicate Beatles-inspired fingerpicking to the barn-burning instrumentals that have become a cornerstone of his live shows. On a masterful arrangement of Carole King’s “Tapestry,” Doyle Dykes joins Emmanuel for an inspired version of the ’70s classic. Relying on his arsenal of Maton, Collings, Larrivee, and Gibson guitars, Emmanuel knows how to pick just the right axe for the tune. For the vocal version of the jazz standard “Moon River,” he chooses a vintage Gretsch Synchromatic to cop an old-school jazz vibe. Between the two discs there are some common threads. The title track, “Haba Na Haba” (Swahili for “Little by Little”) is given an instrumental treatment on the first disc while the second disc adds Pam Rose and Victor Wooten for a funky vocal version. The tracks that stand out most are the solo pieces where Emmanuel lets his musical spirit flow freely. “Mountains of Illinois,” written by fellow Nashville super-picker Pat Bergeson, is a bluesy ballad that is equal parts Chet Atkins and Joe Pass. With so many moving parts on this album, from different guests to genres, Emmanuel has created one of the most accessible albums of his career, one that’s sure to inspire other guitarists to drop the pick more often.
Rig Rundown: Adam Shoenfeld

Whether in the studio or on solo gigs, the Nashville session-guitar star holds a lotta cards, with guitars and amps for everything he’s dealt.

Adam Shoenfeld has helped shape the tone of modern country guitar. How? Well, the Nashville-based session star, producer, and frontman has played on hundreds of albums and 45 No. 1 country hits, starting with Jason Aldean’s “Hicktown,” since 2005. Plus, he’s found time for several bands of his own as well as the first studio album under his own name, All the Birds Sing, which drops January 28.

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Diatonic sequences are powerful tools. Here’s how to use them wisely.

Advanced

Beginner

• Understand how to map out the neck in seven positions.
• Learn to combine legato and picking to create long phrases.
• Develop a smooth attack—even at high speeds.

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Knowing how to function in different keys is crucial to improvising in any context. One path to fretboard mastery is learning how to move through positions across the neck. Even something as simple as a three-note-per-string major scale can offer loads of options when it’s time to step up and rip. I’m going to outline seven technical sequences, each one focusing on a position of a diatonic major scale. This should provide a fun workout for the fingers and hopefully inspire a few licks of your own.
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