Charvel Annouces Return of Pro-Mod Series
San Dimas Style 1 HH

Charvel is proud to announce the reintroduction of the Pro-Mod series of guitars.

Scottsdale, AZ (April 12, 2013) -- Charvel is proud to announce the reintroduction of the Pro-Mod series of guitars. New Pro-Mod San Dimas and So-Cal style models feature sleek, hot-rodded designs in striking finishes for the demanding player.

The Pro-Mod So-Cal 1 HH has been performance-tuned for scorching sound and outstanding feel. The So-Cal 1 HH features a one-piece quartersawn maple neck with compound radius and 22 jumbo frets, dual Seymour Duncan humbucking pickups, recessed Floyd Rose Original double-locking tremolo bridge, Charvel tuners and black hardware. Available in Black, Snow White, Candy Apple Red and Candy Apple Blue.

The Pro-Mod San Dimas Style 1 HH is a return to Charvel’s Southern California roots, with a 22-fret compound-radius one-piece quartersawn maple neck, dual direct-mounted Seymour Duncan humbucking pickups, recessed Floyd Rose double-locking tremolo bridge, Charvel tuners and black hardware. Available in Black, Snow White, Candy Apple Red, Candy Apple Blue, Black Burst, Blue Burst and Red Burst.

The Pro-Mod San Dimas Style 1 HS HT is the hard tail version of the San Dimas, featuring a 22-fret compound-radius one-piece quartersawn maple neck with rosewood fingerboard, single-coil (neck) and humbucker (bridge) direct-mounted Seymour Duncan pickups, Charvel hard tail bridge, Charvel locking tuners and black hardware. Available in Black, Snow White, Candy Apple Red and Candy Apple Blue.

“The new Pro-Mod series is the flagship of the Charvel line,” said Michael McGregor, product manager for Charvel Guitars. “Manufacturing each guitar in our own state-of-the-art North American factory ensures we have complete control over the fit and finish of every Pro-Mod that comes off the line.”

For more information:
Charvel Guitars

This rare English Tonemaster was made circa 1957.

The Valco-produced English Tonemaster is a rare, lap-steel-inspired gem from the 1950s—when genres and guitar design were fluid.

The 1950s were a peculiar time for the electric guitar. Innovators, designers, and tinkerers were pushing the boundaries of the instrument, while musicians were experimenting with various playing techniques and sounds. There was an evolution of sorts (or de-evolution, depending on your slant) from solidbody “sit-down” guitars, like pedal and lap steels, to “stand-up” or “upright” solidbody electrics. If you look at an early Fender catalog—let’s say from 1953—you’ll see the Telecaster (and Esquire), the Precision Bass, and then a whole bunch of steel guitars. There was a shift underway, and many manufacturers began to blur the lines of what a guitar should look, sound, and play like.

Read More Show less

PRS Guitars and John Mayer officially announce the PRS SE Silver Sky, an affordable version of the original with PRS trademark bird inlays and three single-coil pickups.

Read More Show less
x