Cort Releases the AS-OC4 Acoustic-Electric Guitar

The latest addition to the AS series features a solid, all-mahogany body, open-pore finish, and OM cutaway design.

Seoul, South Korea (April 11, 2017) -- A solid, all-mahogany body with a natural, open-pore finish and orchestra model (OM) cutaway design—these are the standout features of the new Cort AS-OC4 acoustic-electric guitar, the manufacturer’s latest addition to its flagship AS Series. Similar to other models in this series, the AS-OC4 offers high-quality construction and outstanding tone without the steep price tag associated with many high-end acoustics.

Cort’s AS Series is made with the very best materials, components and workmanship for instruments that improve with age like fine wine. The dark, open-pore finish of the AS-OC4 ensures that this guitar will age as desired—unlike a laminated guitar—allowing the wood choice to resonate naturally. In terms of tonal quality, players will find that the AS-OC4’s mahogany provides balanced dynamics, with ample bottom-end response that doesn’t inhibit the top-end. Smaller than a Dreadnought, the AS-OC4 certainly doesn’t lack in volume and has the ability to accommodate a variety of acoustic styles. The OM body features the soft, rounded lines of the Venetian cutaway, allowing the player to get more from the highest of the 20 frets. The quality of this design is reinforced by Cort’s advanced scalloped x-bracing and dovetail neck joint.

Inside the sound hole, players will find the (Fishman Sonitone preamp) and Sonicore pickup with volume and tone control. The pickup’s discrete placement doesn’t inhibit the guitar’s natural tone and preserves the neat, all-natural esthetic. To that point, the body stays simple with a rosewood bridge and 45mm genuine bone nut as well as a subtle pickguard. Moving from the rosewood rosette and down the rosewood fretboard (25.3’’ scale) with dot-inlay, players will note the fine workmanship of the frets, headstock and diecast tuners.

Guitar Interactive Magazine recently published a review that praised the Cort AS-OC4 for its appearance, fine tonal performance and excellent playability. Professional guitarist Lewis Turner summarized, “Even though the acoustic market is saturated, and it’s hard for manufacturers to really stand out, this Cort model does manage it, not only for its looks, but for the high-end finish and attention to detail throughout. The acoustic tone is also top notch, thanks to the high-quality wood used and great set-up.” The review concludes that in a blindfold test, it would be hard to tell the difference between the As-OC4 and other well known, high-end acoustics, and that if players are looking for this style, they should definitely add this guitar to their list. Hear Turner demo the AS-OC4 in his video review by clicking here.

The attractively designed AS-OC4 comes with a hard-shell case and is humbly priced at MSRP $799. Learn more about the Cort AS series of acoustic guitars by visiting www.cortguitars.com

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Cort Guitars

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