Dunlop Releases the MXR EVH 5150 Overdrive

The resulting EVH 5150 Overdrive joins hand-adjusted multi-stage MOSFETs with a full complement of controls.

Benicia, CA (October 26, 2015) -- The MXR design team has collaborated with Eddie Van Halen to deliver a full range of powerful saturation and hyper-driven tones right at your feet. The resulting EVH 5150 Overdrive joins hand-adjusted multi-stage MOSFETs with a full complement of controls to deliver overdriven tube-like tones and exceptional sonic flexibility through a wide variety of amps and speaker cabinets.

Whether on stage or in the studio, the EVH 5150 Overdrive’s controls dial up the whole spectrum—from Eddie’s groundbreaking early classic tones to the high gain, super-articulate sound he uses today. Output and Gain controls set your volume and distortion levels, while the 3-band passive tone stack EQ section shapes your sound to taste. The Boost switch kicks the 5150 Overdrive into high gear with extra gain and compression, and the Gate control—powered by the Smart Gate circuit—tames unwanted noise.

The EVH 5150 Overdrive features true bypass switching and comes in a road-worthy housing emblazoned with custom EVH artwork.

Features:

  • Designed in close collaboration with Eddie Van Halen
  • Delivers a full range of powerful saturation via multi-stage MOSFETs
  • Features 3-band EQ section for versatile tweakability
  • Boost switch adds extra gain and compression
  • Gate control tames unwanted noise
  • Sounds great through a wide variety of amps and speaker cabs

$199 street

For more information:
Dunlop

Rig Rundown: Adam Shoenfeld

Whether in the studio or on solo gigs, the Nashville session-guitar star holds a lotta cards, with guitars and amps for everything he’s dealt.

Adam Shoenfeld has helped shape the tone of modern country guitar. How? Well, the Nashville-based session star, producer, and frontman has played on hundreds of albums and 45 No. 1 country hits, starting with Jason Aldean’s “Hicktown,” since 2005. Plus, he’s found time for several bands of his own as well as the first studio album under his own name, All the Birds Sing, which drops January 28.

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Diatonic sequences are powerful tools. Here’s how to use them wisely.

Advanced

Beginner

• Understand how to map out the neck in seven positions.
• Learn to combine legato and picking to create long phrases.
• Develop a smooth attack—even at high speeds.

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Knowing how to function in different keys is crucial to improvising in any context. One path to fretboard mastery is learning how to move through positions across the neck. Even something as simple as a three-note-per-string major scale can offer loads of options when it’s time to step up and rip. I’m going to outline seven technical sequences, each one focusing on a position of a diatonic major scale. This should provide a fun workout for the fingers and hopefully inspire a few licks of your own.
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