A replica of one of the cleanest 'bursts that Bonamassa has ever seen.

Nashville, TN (November 26, 2019) -- Epiphone, the leader in affordable professional instruments presents the limited-edition Joe Bonamassa 1960 Les Paul Standard “Norm Burst.” Joe and Epiphone’s luthiers worked in close collaboration with attention to the fine details at Epiphone’s headquarters in Nashville, TN. As the seventh signature guitar partnership, Joe and Epiphone are committed to producing affordable guitars for Music lovers and Joe Bonamassa fans alike. The exclusive Epiphone “Norm Burst” is designed after the pristine 1960 Les Paul that Joe discovered at Norm’s Rare Guitars in Tarzana, California. The guitar features a classic Les Paul Mahogany body with a Norm Burst finish, ProBuckerTM humbuckers with 50s style wiring and a “Lifton” style case. The Epiphone Joe Bonamassa 1960 Les Paul Standard “Norm Burst” is available at Authorized Epiphone dealers worldwide.

“Norm took ownership of it in the 1980s and his staff nicknamed it the “Norm Burst,” says Joe Bonamassa. “It’s the cleanest vintage Les Paul Standard I’ve ever seen. It’s so new that the nickel pickup covers look chrome. Even the original hang tangs were still there. Acoustically, the first sample that Epiphone sent me sounded like the original. Once again, Epiphone has made a great guitar that I’m proud to have my name on. Tune it up, turn it on and you can rule the world.”

$699 Street

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Beginner

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