Ernie Ball Music Man Introduces John Petrucci, St. Vincent, and James Valentine Artist Series Guitars

Ernie Ball Music Man Artist Series guitars are ground-up designs created hand-in-hand with the players’ input.

Los Angeles, CA (January 28, 2016) -- Ernie Ball Music Man, one of the world’s premier guitar, bass and amp manufacturers, has debuted three new Artist Series guitars: the John Petrucci “JP16”, the Annie Clark “St. Vincent” and the James Valentine “Valentine” models. The new guitars were designed with extensive input from the artists and manufactured to their exact specifications.

“We are honored to be working with such talented guitar players and instrument designers like John Petrucci (Dream Theater), Annie Clark (St. Vincent), and James Valentine (Maroon 5),” said Sterling Ball, CEO of Ernie Ball. “Unlike with other signature instruments, Ernie Ball Music Man Artist Series guitars are ground-up designs created hand-in-hand with the players’ input to enable them to develop guitars that push the limits of design and performance.”


The Ernie Ball Music Man John Petrucci “JP16” offers an ideal combination of the best features of all John Petrucci signature instruments, one of the world’s best-selling artist signature models. The JP16 retains the styling of the current JP15 and features a basswood body with original JP6 arm scoop, black Floyd Rose Pro Series Tremolo with matching black hardware, two DiMarzio Illuminator humbucking pickups with a 20dB boost and a 25.5-inch scale, gun-oil finish, 17-inch radius roasted maple neck with ebony fingerboard, and Ernie Ball’s trademarked 4-over-2 headstock and compensated nut, designed for superior tuning stability.

The Ernie Ball Music Man Annie Clark “St. Vincent” features an ergonomic body shape made from lightweight African mahogany, three DiMarzio mini-humbucking pickups and custom wired 5-way switching. Signature knobs, inlays, molded pickguard, 25.5-inch scale, gun-oil finished rosewood neck and 10-inch radius fingerboard, with Ernie Ball’s trademarked 4-over-2 headstock and compensated nut, designed for superior tuning stability as well as Ernie Ball Music Man’s exclusive super smooth modern tremolo are among the guitar’s additional features. It will be available in Black and St. Vincent Blue on March 1, 2016, for $1,899.99 SRP/MAP.

The Ernie Ball Music Man James Valentine “Valentine” guitar features a slab ash body, two Ernie Ball Music Man designed pickups (1-humbucker/1-single coil) with 3-way custom wired lever switch, coil tap, modern hardtail bridge with vintage bent steel saddles, 25.5-inch scale, tinted ultra-light satin polyurethane finish neck with 10-inch radius rosewood or maple fingerboard, 22 stainless steel frets, oversized 4-over-2 headstock and compensated nut, designed for superior tuning stability.

For more information:
Ernie Ball Music Man

Rig Rundown: Adam Shoenfeld

Whether in the studio or on his solo gigs, the Nashville session-guitar star holds a lotta cards, with guitars and amps for everything he’s dealt.

Adam Shoenfeld has helped shape the tone of modern country guitar. How? Well, the Nashville-based session star, producer, and frontman has played on hundreds of albums and 45 No. 1 country hits, starting with Jason Aldean’s “Hicktown,” since 2005. Plus, he’s found time for several bands of his own as well as the first studio album under his own name, All the Birds Sing, which drops January 28.

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Diatonic sequences are powerful tools. Here’s how to use them wisely.

Advanced

Beginner

• Understand how to map out the neck in seven positions.
• Learn to combine legato and picking to create long phrases.
• Develop a smooth attack—even at high speeds.

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Knowing how to function in different keys is crucial to improvising in any context. One path to fretboard mastery is learning how to move through positions across the neck. Even something as simple as a three-note-per-string major scale can offer loads of options when it’s time to step up and rip. I’m going to outline seven technical sequences, each one focusing on a position of a diatonic major scale. This should provide a fun workout for the fingers and hopefully inspire a few licks of your own.
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