All six of the new models have pro-quality components from makers such as Seymour Duncan, EMG, Grover, and Floyd Rose.

EC-400

North Hollywood, CA (June 7, 2019) -- ESP Guitars has just introduced six new LTD models in the “400 Series” range that all offer killer new metallic fade finishes. The LTD “400 Series” are guitars designed with the professional performing and recording musician in mind, but are available at a price that even casual players can afford. All six of the new models have pro-quality components from makers such as Seymour Duncan. EMG, Grover, and Floyd Rose.

The EC-400 comes in Black Pearl Fade Metallic ($749) and has a mahogany body and three-piece mahogany thin U-shaped neck, joined by set-thru construction for smooth, fast access to the highest frets. Its professional components include Grover tuners and EMG 60 (neck) and EMG 81 (bridge) active pickups for a wealth of tones from deep and dark to in-your-face aggressive sounds. The H-400 Crimson Fade Metallic ($749) offers an arch-topped mahogany body. Built with set-thru construction, it has a speedy and comfortable three-piece thin U-shaped maple neck. Its fixed bridge is string-thru-body for added sustain and tone, and it includes an outstanding pair of direct-mounted Seymour Duncan Jazz (neck) and Custom-5 (bridge) pickups for all the harmonically complex, dynamic tones you need. The M-400 Solar Fade Metallic ($749) is another guitar that won’t blend into the background. Like other M Series guitars, the M-400 is built for speed, with an extra thin U-shaped three-piece bolt-on maple neck, reverse headstock, and Floyd Rose Special bridge. The M-400 Solar Fade Metallic also comes with an outstanding pair of direct-mounted Seymour Duncan Jazz (neck) and Custom-5 (bridge) pickups.

The MH-400FR Blue Pearl Fade Metallic ($849) is a neck-thru-body guitar that includes a set of direct-mount EMG 85 (neck) and EMG 81 (bridge) active pickups, a great combination of punch tones for rhythm and lead playing in rock and metal. You also get reliable components like Grover tuners and a Floyd Rose Special bridge. For a non-tremolo version, the MH-400NT Violet Pearl Fade Metallic ($799) is another neck-thru-body design, and offers Grover tuners and a TOM bridge with string-thru-body functionality for great sustain. Finally, for players who love the asymmetrical double-cutaway ESP Viper shape (but have been waiting for a guitar in a finish other than basic black), the Viper-400 Pinkberry Fade Metallic ($749) lets you grab the spotlight in ways you couldn’t have dreamed of before. It’s a classic set-neck design at 24.75” scale with a mahogany body and three-piece mahogany neck. You get pro features like Grover tuners, and the amazing and versatile tones from a set of Seymour Duncan’s vintage-voiced ’59 (neck) and hot-rodded JB (bridge) pickups.

The new LTD “400 Series” models are now shipping and are available via all authorized ESP dealers.

For more information:
ESP Guitars

Rig Rundown: Adam Shoenfeld

Whether in the studio or on his solo gigs, the Nashville session-guitar star holds a lotta cards, with guitars and amps for everything he’s dealt.

Adam Shoenfeld has helped shape the tone of modern country guitar. How? Well, the Nashville-based session star, producer, and frontman has played on hundreds of albums and 45 No. 1 country hits, starting with Jason Aldean’s “Hicktown,” since 2005. Plus, he’s found time for several bands of his own as well as the first studio album under his own name, All the Birds Sing, which drops January 28.

Read More Show less

Diatonic sequences are powerful tools. Here’s how to use them wisely.

Advanced

Beginner

• Understand how to map out the neck in seven positions.
• Learn to combine legato and picking to create long phrases.
• Develop a smooth attack—even at high speeds.

{u'media': u'[rebelmouse-document-pdf 13574 site_id=20368559 original_filename="7Shred-Jan22.pdf"]', u'file_original_url': u'https://roar-assets-auto.rbl.ms/documents/13574/7Shred-Jan22.pdf', u'type': u'pdf', u'id': 13574, u'media_html': u'7Shred-Jan22.pdf'}
Knowing how to function in different keys is crucial to improvising in any context. One path to fretboard mastery is learning how to move through positions across the neck. Even something as simple as a three-note-per-string major scale can offer loads of options when it’s time to step up and rip. I’m going to outline seven technical sequences, each one focusing on a position of a diatonic major scale. This should provide a fun workout for the fingers and hopefully inspire a few licks of your own.
Read More Show less
x