Free the Tone Releases the BV-1V Black Vehicle Bass Overdrive

From a natural grind to a heavy distorted sound, the bass-specific drive can create a wide variety of sounds similar to driving an old-school vacuum tube amplifier.

Kanagawa, Japan (August 9, 2018) -- The FREE THE TONE BLACK VEHICLE bass overdrive pedal is part of the new FREE THE TONE 15th anniversary project INTEGRATED SERIES.

The “BLACK VEHICLE” has sparkling overtones and long sustain you’d find in well driven vacuum tube amplifiers and it delivers a pleasant drive sound. This unit realizes wide range “amp like” sounds.

The BLACK VEHICLE highlights include:

  • Implemented a newly developed HTS (Holistic Tonal Solution) circuit for electric bass guitars. The HTS circuit prevents a thin sound, makes the texture of the sounds from the unit uniform when it is turned on and off, and feeds the received signals to the following circuit in an optimal condition.
  • Newly designed EQ circuits and MIX circuit are also installed. The TREBLE and BASS EQ circuits affect only the drive sound. The unprocessed original signal (dry sound) is mixed with the drive sound in the MIX circuit. The EQ and MIX circuits minimize signal phase error, prevent the sound from being buried when the drive amount is increased, and realize an ultimate drive sound that has a clear pitch and contour of sound.
  • Two types of boost: “PRE BOOST” controls the sound amount sent to the overdrive section and “POST BOOST” adjusts the output volume. These controls allow you to perform extensive sound creation; for example you can increase only the volume without changing the tone character, increase the distortion amount without changing the volume, etc.

The BLACK VEHICLE carries a suggested retail price of $370.00, and can be purchased after Sept 10, 2018.

For more information:
Free The Tone

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