The Phaser Mini is produced in Japan and features a three control layout along with switchable stage modes.

Bensalem, PA (January 15, 2021) -- Ibanez is introducing two new additions to its Mini pedal lineup, the Phaser Mini and Booster Mini.

The Phaser Mini is produced in Japan and features a three control layout; Depth, Feedback and Speed. Through these controls, the Phaser Mini offers a variety of sounds ranging from subtle texture to deep saturation. Moreover, it is designed to retain a clarity of dry signal even when set to the highest effect intensity. It also features switchable STAGE mode, 4 or 6. 4-STAGE mode delivers traditional Phaser tones, typically used in classic rock. 6-STAGE mode provides more intense and dramatic effect. The PHMini also features 100 percent pure analog circuitry and a true bypass switch.

The Booster Mini also features a three control layout; BASS, TREBLE and LEVEL. Unlike a single knob booster, the BASS and TREBLE EQ enables significant tonal flexibility. For example, while set to the “Wide Range” setting (Turing Bass and Treble all the way up) the guitar tone will become broader, with more volume and presence across the entire frequency range, and the “Mid Boost” setting is ideal for cutting though a band mix. All of the design, development, production, and quality control for the BTMini has been done in Japan. The BT Mini also features a Japanese-made JRC MUSES 8820, a high-quality op-amp used in amplifiers that delivers tonal brightness, even while the amp is pushed into overdrive. A true bypass switch provides the shortest, most direct signal path, as well as the cleanest possible sound.

Both of these new pedals provide enhanced tonal flexibility and expanded creative possibilities, while occupying Minimal space on your pedalboard.

Phaser Mini

  • Depth, Feedback and Speed controls
  • Stage switch (Stage 4 / Stage 6)
  • True Bypass
  • Power supply: External DC 9 Volt AC adapter (Center negative)
  • Made in Japan

LIST: $171.42

ESTIMATED STREET PRICE: $119.99

Booster Mini

  • Bass, Level and Treble controls
  • Max. Gain: +24dB
  • True Bypass
  • Power supply: External DC 9 Volt AC adapter (Center negative)
  • Made in Japan

LIST: $142.84

ESTIMATED STREET PRICE: $99.99

For more information:
Ibanez

How jangle, glam, punk, shoegaze, and more blended to create a worldwide phenomenon. Just don’t forget your tambourine.

Intermediate

Beginner

  • Learn genre-defining elements of Britpop guitar.
  • Use the various elements to create your own Britpop songs.
  • Discover how “borrowing” from the best can enrich your own playing.
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When considering the many bands that fall under the term “Britpop”–Oasis, Blur, Suede, Elastica, Radiohead’s early work, and more–it’s clear that the genre is more an attitude than a specific musical style. Still, there are a few guitar techniques and approaches that abound in the genre, many of which have been “borrowed” (the British music press’ friendly way of saying “appropriated”) from earlier British bands of the 1960s, ’70s, and ’80s.

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Photo by Steve Trager

For his stylistically diverse new album, the fiery guitar hero steps back from his gear obsession and focuses on a deep pool of influences and styles.

Twenty years ago, Joe Bonamassa was a struggling musician living in New York City. He survived on a diet of peanut butter and jelly sandwiches and ramen noodles that he procured from the corner bodega at Columbus Avenue and 83rd Street. Like many dreamers waiting for their day in the sun, Joe also played "Win for Life" every week. It was, in his words, "literally my ticket out of this hideous business." While the lottery tickets never brought in the millions, Joe's smokin' guitar playing on a quartet of albums from 2002 to 2006—So, It's Like That, Blues Deluxe, Had to Cry Today, and You & Me—did get the win, transforming Joe into a guitar megastar.

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