Park and EarthQuaker Devices Partner and Introduce the Park Fuzz Sound

Like the originals, it uses germanium transistors to recreate authentic '60s fuzz tones.

Akron, OH (January 13, 2014) -- Park Amplifiers and EarthQuaker Devices introduce the Park Fuzz Sound, the first in a collaboration to produce effect pedals consistent with the Park brand.

The Park Fuzz Sound is a variation of the 1960s British three knob fuzz pedals available under various brand names including Park. Like the originals, it uses germanium transistors to recreate authentic 60s fuzz tones. New Old Stock (NOS) transistors are matched for consistency from pedal to pedal.

While the new Park Fuzz Sound is based on the originals there are a few differences that make it more usable for today’s guitarist. Most importantly, the Tone control (labeled Bass-Treble) range has been increased so that the fuzz goes from warm and mellow to biting. User-friendly features include a smaller pedalboard friendly size, a nine volt adapter jack with standard polarity plus true bypass switching. Low current draw insures that the pedal is ready for isolated power supplies.

The new Park Fuzz Sound is hand-made, one at a time in Akron, Ohio and will be sold and distributed through EarthQuaker Devices dealers and distributors worldwide.

For more information:
EarthQuaker Devices

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