Following in the footsteps of their Timeline and Mobius pedals, Strymon has announced the release of the BigSky Reverberator.

Westlake Village, CA (October 16, 2013) -- Plug into BigSky and instantly lift your sound into the stratosphere. The world below you fades into the distance, and you're elevated into a glow of lush, glorious, radiant reverbs.

To create a reverb experience as natural, beautiful, and immersive as BigSky required tremendous feats of sound engineering and artistic imagination. Using the fundamentals of acoustical science as our beacon, we carefully studied and scientifically analyzed reverb technology from the past fifty years. We faithfully captured the essence of these classic sounds, and forged ahead to dream up our vision of reverbs from the future.

Feel the mechanical tension of the Spring reverbs. Hear the floating particles of the Cloud machine. Defy the laws of physics with the Nonlinear reverbs. Unleash the multi-head reverberations of the Magneto machine. BigSky gives you twelve studio-class reverb machines, each with simple yet powerful controls.

We knew we must take reverb to a whole new level. With careful attention to detail, innovative analog circuitry design, an insanely powerful SHARC processor, and the utilization of top-shelf components, we've developed a reverb pedal that fits on your pedal board yet has better audio quality than many rack reverb units. This fusion of science with art has just one goal. To provide you with the most musically inspirational reverb experiences possible.

Watch the company's video demo:

For more information:
Strymon

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